Curriculum Guides Year 7

Art

Introduction

The Art Department offers a welcoming atmosphere where pupils can explore their own ideas and personality as well as satisfy the requirements of the course. We aim that all students develop creatively, independently and individually through a challenging range of drawing, painting and mixed media projects. They are given a balanced programme of art and design activities and are introduced to the work of artists, designers and craftsman, learning to use these influences to develop and inform their own practical work. Pupils in Year 7 have two 40 minute periods per week.

Content

A variety of briefs will be given during the course.
They will fall into the following areas:

  • Observational study, looking at form, volume, light and shadow using a variety of media.
  • Compositional study, looking at background/middleground/foreground.
  • Use of photography to create the composition and practice the fields.
  • Mark Making, Sgraffito – experimenting with mixed media.
  • Portraits – understanding structure of the face.
  • Collage portraits.
  • Each project will include the study of related Artists.

Skills

The skills to be assessed during the course are:

  • Investigating and making
  • Knowledge and understanding

Homework

Pupils will be given homework each week. This could consist of finishing classwork, collecting reference material such as images, an observational study or research.

Assessment

There is continual assessment of all skills.

Resources and Materials

Individual Equipment:

  • Coloured pencils, black biro or pilot pen, eraser, HB pencil, ruler.
  • The Art Department has a well-stocked, continually updated library of books and videos. Digital imagery is a resource used extensively in all aspects of the course.

Cultura

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 6º de Primaria dentro del sistema español de la Enseñanza Obligatoria en el marco de la LOE. Nuestro programa de estudios desarrolla los contenidos que el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid han prescrito para los currículos de la Educación Primaria. La principal finalidad de esta materia es aportar un nivel lingüístico más elevado a los alumnos españoles que se educan en el sistema británico, así como introducirles al mundo de la literatura y cultura españolas, enseñarles a valorar el español como cuarto idioma más hablado del mundo y darles la oportunidad de ser verdaderamente bilingües. Se trabaja fundamentalmente en Lengua dando una gran importancia a la lectura y a la escritura de textos imaginativos y creativos; además, se estudian las bases de la Gramática (como fundamento para la posterior profundización en la etapa de la ESO) y se fomenta el conocimiento, desarrollo y ampliación de las destrezas lingüísticas de los alumnos (vocabulario, estructuras, dicción, expresión oral y escrita...)

Content

Term 1: SPAIN - 14 weeks

  • Physical Geography of Spain (2 weeks)
    • Comunidades Autónomas and their boundaries: oceans, seas, main mountain chains, rivers, lakes, towns, cities, flags, symbols and languages.
    • Material: Internet, department webpage: www.runnymedespanish.weebly.com
  • Madrid: case study (3 weeks)
    • Physical geography, symbols, flag, language, gastronomy, local festivals and main traditions.
    • Material: Internet, department webpage: www.runnymedespanish.weebly.com
  • Work on individual presentations (4 weeks)
    • Each student chooses one “Comunidad Autónoma” and researches about it in order to complete their presentation: physical geography, climate, flag, symbols, language, gastronomy, festivals, history, art, artists…
  • Día de los muertos/All Saints’ Day (2 weeks)
    • Understanding the tradition
    • From past times to present times: traditions and festivals related to both festivities
    • Literature: El Monte de las Ánimas, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer
  • Christmas (3 weeks)
    • Understanding the tradition
    • From past times to present times: origin and tradition. Changes in our time. Tradition in the Hispanic world.
    • Christmas' Carols

Term 2: DISCOVERY OF AMERICA - 12 weeks

  • Discovery, conquest and colonisation of America (4 weeks)
    Starting Point: A great adventure
    • Christopher Columbus and his world: the historical character.
    • Social and historical context.
    • The Catholic Monarchs and their world.
    • Role- Play: interview: Columbus and the Catholic Monarchs.
    • His travels and adventures: Columbus’ travels: maps, itineraries…
    • Columbus’ Museum in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.
  • Conquest of the American continent (2 weeks)
    • The Conquest: main characters, historical facts
  • Colonisation: Impact on both continents (6 weeks)
    • Language: languages in precolumbian America. Expansion of the Spanish language in the continent. Linguistic exchange. Spanish in the American continent nowadays.
    • Religion: precolumbian religions and beliefs. Spread of Christianity. Impact: new rites and celebrations.
    • Art: precolumbian art and the spread of art coming from the Iberian Peninsula.

Term 3: LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES - 10 weeks

  • Physical Geography of Latin American countries (names, borders, location, size, oceans, mountain chains, lakes, forests, volcanos, flora, fauna, climate). (5 weeks)
    • General knowledge about the physical geography of the Latin American countries
  • Work on their chosen country and presentation (5 weeks)
    • Each student chooses one Latin American country and research for 4 weeks in order to complete their presentation: physical geography, climate, flag, symbols, language, gastronomy, festivals, history, art, artists…
    • Presentations will take place on the final week.
    • Material: Internet, department webpage: www.runnymedespanish.weebly.com

Grammar

Verb tenses: present, imperfect, preterite, future, conditional and perfect indicative. Imperative mood. Reflexive verbs. Present and imperfect subjunctive. Conditional sentences. Subject, direct and indirect object pronouns.

Skills

  • Speaking
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Homework

  • One 30-minute homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • At times pupils will need to work on their presentations at home.
  • Pupils must read in Spanish at home.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment. Assessment is also based on the quality and effort put on projects and presentations. There is no exam at the end of the term/year. The progress made in this subject will be reported together with the subject Spanish.

Resources and Materials


English

Introduction

The teaching of English for first and second language speakers covers the entire area of language used for practical and expressive ends, and the domain The teaching of English for first and second language speakers covers the entire area of language used for practical and expressive ends, and the domain of literature. The curriculum is, of necessity, more a description of skills, techniques and accomplishments than a body of knowledge. There are five lessons each week and three groups – two parallel ability groups and a third smaller group for those students whose English has not reached a level of parity with their mother tongue. The intention is for students of this group to obtain a thorough grounding in English that will make them suitable candidates for the examination open to first language speakers in Years 11 and 13, IGCSEs, AS and A2 Levels.

Content

All pupils, in whatever group, will read a wide range of literature as well as non-fiction texts and media.
The range of literature will cover the three genres: poetry, prose fiction and drama.

  • Class readers for all groups provide further study and writing opportunities. Studying a complete work of fiction gives the pupil deeper insight into the organisation of a work of literature. Typical texts used as class readers in Year 7 include:
  • Skellig by David Almond, The Pearl by John Steinbeck and Journey to Jo’burg by Beverley Naidoo.
  • Grammar and Comprehension: Letts English Coursebook KS3. This book provides a wide range of readings grouped in themes. These lead on to discussion and writing opportunities.

Supplementary English:

Supplementary English classes take place twice a week and offer weaker pupils the opportunity to improve basic grammatical skills and improve their comprehension of English texts. These classes are taught in the lunch hour and pupils are obliged to attend should their teacher deem it necessary.

Skills

The current National Curriculum, on which this guide is based, outlines an integrated programme of study built upon three Attainment Targets:

  • Speaking and Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Speaking and Listening

All pupils, in whatever group, will be given the opportunity to contribute talk of various kinds, adapting their speech to suit listeners and activity, and to develop as effective listeners.

Reading

In addition to the literature of the British Isles, pupils will be introduced to other literature in the English language. Some of the reading will be close study work. Independent reading, library use and a culture of literacy will be encouraged. One lesson a week will be given over to independent reading. Pupils will have a book list appropriate to their year group and be expected to read some books from this list. These books are available form the school library. Pupils keep a reading record of the books they have read.

Writing

Pupils will be encouraged to write more confidently in a variety of styles and for a range of purposes and readers.
Over the year a wide variety of forms and styles will be taught and practised: among others, this will include letters, chronological accounts, biographies, stories, essays and reports

Homework

There are two homeworks a week. Each homework should take 30 minutes. Homework examples: letter; empathetic essay; piece of creative writing; comprehension passage and questions; worksheet from Letts English textbook; book reviews and newspaper articles. Pupils will receive grammar exercises depending on the needs of the group.

Assessment

Students receive grades ( A-E ) for each piece of work. Staff write targets for the pupils as a standard part of marking. The examination at Christmas assesses the first term’s work. The Summer examination assesses the year’s work as a whole. Any movement from one group to another is usually made at Christmas and at the end of the year.

Resources and Materials

There is a large stock of supplementary material for classes and individual pupils. The library offers the pupils a wide range of reading material. The department also has over 150 DVDs and audio tapes.


French

Introduction

Languages are a key component of education at Runnymede College, with all students studying French up to IGCSE in Year 11 and a large number continuing in the Sixth Form. The study of French provides students with a lifelong skill in communicating in a widely spoken language of continued global importance, and the experience of doing so opens students up to a different culture and gives them the tools necessary to learn other languages in the future.
At Key Stage 3 the emphasis is on the acquisition of the vocabulary and structures necessary to describe the students' personal surroundings and interests. The key tenses required to refer to the past, present and future are introduced and the foundations are laid for the IGCSE course.
Year 7 pupils are not set. They will all be given the same exam and according to their results in June, Year 7 will be set in 4 groups for Year 8: a slower (4), 2 middle (3 & 2) and a quicker (1) moving set. All sets will still end up covering the extended section of the IGCSE syllabus by the end of Year 11. Some candidates will sit the exam in Year 10. All our students enter for all components at extended level (targeted grades B, A, A*). Pupils are given 3 lessons per week.

Content

  • Grammar
  • Definite and indefinite article
  • Agreement of adjectives
  • Plural of nouns and adjectives
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Demonstrative adjectives
  • Partitive articles
  • Interrogative pronouns
  • Present tense of regular verbs
  • Irregular verbs: avoir, être, faire, aller, prendre, mettre, acheter, boire, sortir, écrire.

Topics

  • Personal identification
  • Family relationships
  • Description of house and home
  • Pets, asking information about direction
  • Names of countries
  • Going shopping, names of shops
  • Hobbies and pastimes, sports
  • Conversation at mealtimes
  • Understanding menus, ordering food and drink
  • Clothes
  • School subjects

Skills

Equal importance will be given to the skills of:

  • Speaking
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Homework

We believe homework is of paramount importance in the learning process as it enables students to work on their own and consolidate their knowledge and to self-assess their progress. Homework is given twice a week, including a mixture of exercises and revision of recently studied vocabulary and grammar for test.

Assessment

Regular testing and assessment takes place each lesson. There is a departmental exam in November and a final exam in June.

Resources and Materials

Used for each unit

  • Tricolore 1: Textbook; copymasters; assessment pack; CDs
  • Website: Frenchoutofthebox.com / relevantideas.weebly.com

Geography

Introduction

Geography at Runnymede aims to nurture students' curiosity and sense of wonder about places. It helps young people understand the complex and ever-changing world we live in, helping them to explore the links between the diverse range of societies, economies and environments. It explores where places are, how places and landscapes are formed and how people and their environment interact. It encourages students to develop a geographical imagination that enables students to relate to other places and people, and to appreciate the cultures and perspectives of others. Geography encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues facing the world at present and in the future, encouraging students to become active and engaged citizens of our world.

Content

Year 7 Geography aims to encourage the development of a students’ sense of place. Students learn the skills to locate different places; learn about the reasons for why people live where they do; why our weather and climate vary so much and where our resources and energy come from.

Topics

Pupils are introduced to the different aspects of Geography – Physical, Human and Environmental Geography.

  • Map skills – Students develop basic map skills, including the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS).
  • Settlements – Students explore the changing landscapes of our world, looking at where and why people live where they do.
  • China – Students explore the physical and human geography of this country.
  • Weather and Climate – Students explore the hydrological cycle and why we get different types of weather. They also look at different world climates, exploring the reasons for such a range of climates around the world.
  • The Geography of Food – Students look at agricultural practices and the food industry.

Skills

  • To use atlases, globes, maps at a range of scales, photographs, satellite images and other geographical data.
  • To construct maps and plans at a variety of scales, using graphical techniques to present evidence.To develop ‘geographical imaginations’ of place.
  • To appreciate different scales – from personal and local to national, international and global.
  • To make links between scales to develop understanding of geographical ideas.
  • To know where places and landscapes are located, why they are there, the patterns and distributions they create, how and why these are changing and the implications for people.
  • To appreciate the differences and similarities between people, places, environments and cultures to inform their understanding of societies and economies. To communicate their knowledge and understanding using geographical vocabulary and conventions in both speech and writing.

Homework

Year 7 have a written homework every week, this could range from project work, research tasks, textbook work, worksheets to report writing. They are also expected to spend time revising and going over their class book notes.

Assessment

Students are assessed continuously, through questioning in class discussions, class work, homework tasks and end of topic assessments. The end of topic assessments could be in the form of a test, essay, project or presentation. Students will also be assessed in their June exams.

Resources and Materials

  • School Geography website – www.schoolgeography.com
  • Keynote presentations and worksheets prepared by the teacher

History

Introduction

The History Dept aims to instil in all pupils a keen interest in the past and an enthusiasm for studying History:

  • By imparting the tools with which to research independently.
  • By exploring key phases of world History that should be meaningful and relevant to our student body.
  • By introducing students to a wide variety of areas of History, political, military, social and economic.
  • By encouraging independent analysis through debate and critical writing.
  • By developing cross curricular skills throughout each course.
  • By providing an enriching and rewarding curriculum that should prepare them for life at university and beyond.

Content

There are two modules covered in Year 7.
An introduction to Historical skills and concepts.
Students learn to use primary and secondary sources in order to explore the past and to learn key concepts such as subjectivity and objectivity, utility, reliability, cause and consequence, continuity and change.
The Norman Conquest and Middle Ages.
Students continue to develop their historical skills and understanding by exploring this key era of British history.
Starting with the Norman Conquest, the course follows the development of key themes of change within the UK. The establishment of a Norman monarchy, techniques of control, the development of urban and rural life, the power struggle between Barons and the Monarchy, the Black Death and the Peasants' Revolt.

  • A wide variety of teaching methods are used.
  • These include individual reading and comprehension exercises, group work, discussion sessions, formal debates, presentations, and a variety of written tasks from evidence exercises to the production of full essays.
  • An individual or group project is undertaken for each course.

Skills

  • Independent reading and note taking.
  • Effective selection and use of relevant evidence to support an argument orally and on paper.
  • Oral and written communication, including a range of written formats and debating styles.
  • Evidence skills – use of primary and secondary sources, assessing gaps, utility, reliability.
  • Use of IT for research and production of work.
  • We aim to include one significant independent project per term.
  • We aim to undertake one key educational visit per year.

Homework

Each group has three 40 minute periods per week. Classes are taught by Form, in mixed ability groups. Homework is set every week and should take approximately 30-45 minutes.

Assessment

Assessment is continuous, made up of class work, homework and formal exams. Feedback to pupils is integral to the department.

Resources and Materials

  • Invasion, Plague and Murder. British History 1066 – 1485.
  • A wide variety of school developed worksheets
  • History, video clips and websites
  • Moodle

ICT

Introduction

Pupils are given the opportunity to explore ICT and learn to use it confidently and with purpose to achieve specific outcomes. They start to use ICT to develop their ideas and record their creative work. They become familiar with hardware and software.
Pupils use a wider range of ICT tools and information sources to support their work. They develop their research skills and decide what information is appropriate for their work. They begin to question quality of information. They learn how to amend their work and present it in a way that suits its audience.
Pupils become increasingly independent users of ICT tools and information sources. They have a better understanding of how ICT can help their work in other subjects and develop their ability to judge when and how to use ICT and where it has limitations. They think about the quality and reliability of information, and access and combine increasing amounts of information. They become more focused, efficient and rigourous in their use of ICT, and carry out a range of increasingly complex tasks.

Content

Pupils will cover the following areas of ICT during Year 7:

  • Log on/off to system
  • Creating documents(word processing, presentation,spreadsheets,
  • Creating files
  • Saving work safely
  • Retrieving files/documents
  • Importing images/information
  • Gathering information

Skills

  • Finding things out
  • Creating, developing and selecting data
  • Exchanging and sharing data
  • Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work

Homework

Homework are based on targets achieved in class.

Assessment

Pupils work which is part of their portfolio is regularly assessed.

Resources and Materials

The computer suite is equipped with 17 Apple Personal Computers. Pupils have access to programs such as LibreOffice, Bean, TextEdit, Pages, Safari.
Pupils will also need to bring a pen drive to classes.


Latin

Introduction

All pupils in Year 7 normally study Latin. The course involves learning the language of the Romans and studying their world. The broad aims of teaching this subject are to develop understanding of how languages work and to improve pupils’ own language-use, to encourage precision of thought, to promote knowledge of an ancient culture which has had a great influence on the modern world, particularly in Europe, and to encourage awareness of cultural variety and change.

Content

The work in Year 7 (and up to Year 10 of the GCSE course) is based closely on the Cambridge Latin Course. There are two distinct parts to the work, but they are closely linked. The narrative passages in the language sections are the basis for work on various aspects of Roman life. A certain amount of additional material is included in the course, particularly on Greek mythology. A booklet is issued in September which has language and Roman life worksheets. (This should be kept with their exercise books.)
A voluntary trip to see the Roman remains in Mérida normally takes place in the summer term, and this serves to illustrate many of the topics studied in the year.
Language: Pupils study Book 1 of the Cambridge Latin Course (4th edition). The language is learnt principally by means of reading stories, doing exercises – from the textbook and additional worksheets - and learning vocabulary. Stages 1 to 5 are covered by the end of the Autumn Term. Stages 6 to 12 are studied in the Spring and Summer Terms.

  • The following are the principal grammar topics. Pupils need to know the endings and how they are used:
    • Nominative and Accusative Singular Cases of Nouns, Subjects and Objects, and the three Declensions of nouns (by the end of Stage 4)
    • The Present Tense of the four Conjugations of verbs, and the 6 person endings (by the end of Stage 5)
    • The Imperfect and Perfect, 3rd persons (by the end of Stage 8)
    • The Nominative and Accusative Plural of Nouns (by end of Stage 8)
    • The Dative Case (introduced in Stage 9)
      (The past tenses are introduced in more detail at the end of the year, but there is little emphasis on this.)
  • At the end of each stage there is a checklist of words to be learnt.
    Roman life: Each stage contains information on a different topic to do with Roman life, mainly in Pompeii. Pupils will do work on the following topics:
    • Houses
    • Daily life
    • The town of Pompeii
    • The forum
    • The theatre
    • Slaves and freedmen
    • The amphitheatre and gladiatorial fights
    • Baths
    • Schools and writing materials

A certain amount of Greek mythology is also studied after Stage 3 in particular, mainly in the form of stories which are read to the pupils, but there may be some reading around the class, too. A book is available to lend to both classes at some time during the year.

Skills

Pupils need to understand and learn grammatical concepts, use written language carefully, analyse precisely and learn vocabulary – which may improve their knowledge of languages which have Latinate vocabulary; they read and learn about Roman culture, appreciating and understanding differences between that world and their own experience, and become increasingly aware of the importance of sources of knowledge and their limitations in studying an ancient culture.

Homework

Homework is normally set twice a week. About half of the homeworks will involve learning vocabulary or endings already introduced in class. The rest will be exercises, translation and questions about Roman life.

Assessment

  • Language: They will be assessed in tests and in school examinations on knowledge and understanding of grammar and ability to translate and understand stories. Longer revision tests may be in the periods between the internal school exams.
    • Grammar and vocabulary: there will be tests and exercises to assess pupils’ progress and to emphasise the need for revision.
    • Translation: written translation of stories and questions in English about them will be used to test ability, mainly in the exams. Vocabulary which has been learnt will be used in these stories.
  • Roman life: Knowledge and understanding of the various areas of Roman life covered during the year will be assessed principally by written homeworks and the exams. Pupils need to be aware of the different types of evidence on which our knowledge is based, and to be able to make comparisons with the modern world. Classwork, projects and tests may be used.

Resources and Materials

Apart from the Cambridge Latin Course book, Tale of Troy and Tales of the Greek Heroes by R.L. Green are available. Sets are for reading at home are available of “the New Windmill Book of Greek Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean and “the Secrets of Vesuvius” by Caroline Lawrence. Photographs are regularly displayed to illustrate aspects of Roman life. A BBC video about the final hours of Pompeii will be watched at the end of the year if there is time. (It can also be used at the start of Year 8.)
“SALVE”, the Runnymede Classics website, has extra information on Roman life topics studied, photographs, exercises to practise grammar and vocabulary, and help with exam revision. It can be accessed by going to http://salve.runnymede-college.com. It contains links to other sites, in particular the Cambridge Latin Course website and the BBC “Romans” site.


Mathematics

Introduction

The Mathematics course in Year 7 is designed to support students in learning how to work in a logical way to solve problems and analyse information and procedures effectively.
In particular, our aim is to give all pupils the opportunity to develop their potential to the full, and to achieve this our students will be taught in mixed attainment classes and encouraged to work at a pace which is appropriate for them. We put a high emphasis on effort, involvement and risk-taking. Mistakes are embraced and encouraged as part of the learning process, and we strive to cultivate a safe and engaging environment for all students to reach their potential. The Mathematics team has carefully planned differentiated resources to ensure that every child has the same opportunities to make progress, and that appropriate support and challenge is available in every lesson. All of the course material and a variety of revision resources are available on the school Mathematics website under KS3, Year 7 (www.runnymedemathematics.weebly.com).
We aim to equip our pupils with a foundation of knowledge and skills that prepares them to start IGCSE material in Year 9.

Content

The work in Year 7 is based on the MEP (Mathematics Enhancement Programme), provided by the Centre of Innovation in Mathematics Teaching. The course is built around developing mathematical skills gained at primary level in the four topics areas of Number, Shape, Algebra and Data Handling.
Calculators are predominantly NOT used in Year 7 in order to focus on building mathematics connections and developing proportional reasoning skills. Calculators (scientific) are required for some topics later in the year and students will be told when to bring these in. There are initially a number of arithmetic units, and for high performing pupils these should be quick revision units. For struggling pupils, it is crucial that these units (and mental maths throughout the course) are given prominence.
The topic schedule for this year can be found on the department website, under KS3, Year 7: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/students_year_7_sow_2019-20_.pdf

Skills

The skills for each unit within the programme are detailed in the Year 7 Targets Checklist document on the department website, under KS3, Year 7: http://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_7_targets_checklist.pdf

Homework

Homework is set on a weekly basis and will normally be a topic assessment related to the content covered in class during that week. Students have a choice between two levels of difficulty to enable them to be successful and challenge themselves appropriately. We encourage pupils to complete their homework independently so that their performance can be used for them to self assess their own progress on a topic and hence inform their revision requirements before a formal test. These unit assessments should be kept and used as revision materials by the pupils once they have been marked by the teacher. We have high expectations of effort and students will be graded on this for every piece of homework. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Students at Runnymede receive five, forty minute periods a week for mathematics. Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on homework tasks.
Students will be formally tested in class each half term (4 assessments in total), followed by the formal end of year exam during internal exams week in June. Test timings are outlined in the schedule link above. All assessments will test material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research.

Resources and Materials

All resources are provided on the department website.
There are two online textbooks, 7A and 7B, provided with answers, along with corresponding Revision Tests to consolidate classwork: http://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/year-7.html
The extra exercises (also on the website) provide an excellent source of revision material.
In lessons, resources include use of the online textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Music

Introduction

At Runnymede the pupils develop their understanding and enjoyment of music by learning how it is constructed, produced and influenced. The aim in key stage 3 stage is to extend pupils' musical experience and knowledge, and develop their appreciation of the richness of different styles of music. Music appreciation is a part of class music and pupil performances are staged within the school. A wide variety of instrumental classes are available including piano, violin, viola, guitar, flute, clarinet, saxophone and percussion. Runnymede is a recognised centre for the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music exams and pupils who wish to take these exams can take them in school on two occasions during the school year.

Content

The pupils understanding and enjoyment of music is developed through activities that bring together requirements from Performing, Composing, Listening and Appraising.
Pupils are encouraged to listen with understanding and to identify the development of musical ideas. These ideas include the musical elements of:

  • Pitch – various scales and modes, e.g. major, minor, ragas
  • Duration – syncopation; rhythm
  • Dynamics – subtle differences in volume, e.g. balance, different parts
  • Tempo – subtle differences in speed, e.g. rubato
  • Timbre – different ways timbre is changed, e.g. by mute, bowing/plucking, electronically; different qualities, e.g. vocal and instrumental tone colour
  • Texture – density and transparency, instrumentation; polyphony; harmony
  • Structure – forms based on single ideas, e.g. riff; forms based on alternating ideas, e.g., rondo, ternary; forms based on developmental ideas, e.g. variation, improvisation
  • Voice control and breathin
  • Composing on the iPad using Garage Ban

The repertoire chosen for performing and listening includes music in a variety of styles, reflecting a diverse cultural heritage:

  • From the European ‘classical’ tradition, from its earliest roots to the present day.
  • From folk and popular music.
  • From the countries and regions of the British Isles.
  • From cultures across the world.
  • By well-known composers and performers, past and present.
  • Choruses from well known operas

Skills

Two main skills are developed throughout the Key Stage:

  • Performing and Composing.
    In this area pupils are taught to:
    • Control sounds made by the voice and a range of tuned, and untuned instruments.
    • Perform with others, and develop awareness of audience, venue and occasion.
    • Compose in response to a variety of stimuli, and explore, a range of resources, e.g. voices, instruments, sounds from the environment.
    • Communicate musical ideas to others.
  • Listening and Appraising.
    Here pupils are taught to:
    • Listen to, and develop understanding of music from different times and places, applying this knowledge to their own work;
    • Respond to, and evaluate, live performances and recorded music, including their own and others’ compositions and performances.

The topics chosen in Year 7 to develop these skills are:

  • Vibrations – instruments; duration, pitch, volume experimenting with melodic and percussive instruments.
  • Instrument shapes and sizes; how they produce sound.
  • The keyboard and how the pitch of other instruments is related.
  • Musical codes; pulse, tempo, rhythm; crotchets and quavers and general musical notation.
  • Folk traditions, including performing and singing music from different countries.
  • Mixing rhythms – ostinato, round, and drone in both modern and classical music.
  • Early music; medieval instruments – minims; stave lines and spaces;
  • Word rhythms – accents and time; dotted notes.

Homework

Instrumental work based on the pieces and instruments studied in class.
Music theory related to the music played in class.
Music history background to pieces listened to in class.
Project work on topics introduced in class.
Composing based on rhythms and ideas initiated in class.

Now that iPads may be taken home, some research is given on

  • History of music
  • Work related to composing in class

Assessment

Assessment consists of classroom performances as solos and in groups. Short evaluations take place throughout the year, with full performances at the end of term or the school year. Project work is brought in and graded according to the guidelines given.

Resources and Materials

INTERNET BASED RESOURCES

The ipad and internet based resources including www.philharmonia.co.uk, Grovemusiconline (oxfordmuisconline.com), cmuse.org, slideplayer.com

TEXT BOOKS

The Music express, Opus and Cambridge Music series of books.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Instruments: piano, keyboards, acoustic, electric and bass guitars, ukuleles, violins, recorders (bass, treble and descant), percussion from drum kits to clave, tuned percussion including glockenspiels, xylophones and chime bars.


Physical Education

Introduction

Physical education is an important part of education at Runnymede College. The objectives of PE include the development of one's motor and social abilities, the promotion of the importance of physical fitness and the encouragement of budding talent in sports.
PE also aims to provide a daily time for some physical activity for the students. The physical training class, as it is also called, involves sports, games, exercise and most importantly, a break from the sedentary learning indoors. One of the other important objectives of physical education is to instil in students the values and skills of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Daily physical activity promotes an awareness of health and well-being among students. It boosts them to engage in physical activities on a daily basis. It promotes them to lead a healthy life in adulthood. The sports, which are a part of a physical education class, also help in developing motor skills in children.

Content

Pupils are given 2 lessons per week in a double class.

  • Term 1:
    • Unit 1: Fitness
    • Unit 2: Swimming
    • Unit 3: Volleyball
    • Unit 4: Football 5 a side
  • Term 2:
    • Unit 5: Athletics
  • Term 3:
    • Unit 6: Athletics
    • Unit 7: Indiaka
    • Unit 8: Kickball

Skills

Equal importance will be given to the skills with different activities and exercises.

  • Fine manipulation skills.
  • Physical Skills:
    • Strength
    • Stamina
    • Flexibility
    • Speed
  • Whole-body Skills:
    • Walking
    • Throwing
    • Balancing
    • Bending
  • Mental Capacities:
    • Creativity
    • Determination
    • Solving Problems (techniques)
    • Active lifestyles and health

Homework

There is no homework except If a pupil is unable to do PE classes in a particular unit (because they have a medical problem: allergy to something or injury). In this case they will be asked to do homework about this unit.

Assessment

Assessment in PE, is concerned primarily with the observation and recording of achievement in the practical context. It should be a continuous activity, blended in as part of normal teaching.The main method of gaining evidence of achievement is by direct observation of:

  • The physical skill of ability of the pupil (during each class).
  • The way in which the pupil has selected and organised their response (during each class with the effort and involvement).
  • The recognition and appreciation by the pupil of performance of themselves and others (at the end of each class and unit, with different events or tests).

Resources and Materials

Equipment: pupils should bring their PE-kit (shorts, T-shirt and trainers) and for swimming they should bring their PE-kit and their swimming things (swim cup, swimming suit, flip-flops and towel).


Science

Introduction

In Year 7 we follow an integrated course involving all three sciences disciplines. This is done on a topic by topic basis, with each subject topic lasting 3 to 4 weeks. Science in Year 7 involves a total of five 40-minute periods per week, carrying out related laboratory practical work and theory to explore diverse topics from all three disciplines. Our students will follow a course of study matched to Key Stage 3 of the national curriculum, modified slightly at times to extend the more able students and to take account of cross curricular themes.

Content

Biology topics will focus on cells and life processes, reproduction, muscles and bones, and the ecosystem. This introduces a number of key ideas that will allow students to understand the cellular nature of biological organisms and how living things interact with their environment.
Chemistry topics will look at chemical reactions, acids and alkalis, solutions and mixtures and will also explain ideas of chemical and physical change using the kinetic theory of the states of matter. This provides a basis for more detailed look at atoms and molecules in the coming years.
Physics topics will explore forces, electricity and the solar system and will introduce ideas about types of energy. These topics will set the scene for further exploration of the physical sciences in years 8 and 9. Overall the course is aimed at introducing key principles of biology, chemistry and physics and allowing students to see the interconnectedness of the sciences and the importance of scientific method.

Skills

Skills will be developed in the areas of:

  • Accurate observation.
  • Planning and carrying out qualitative and quantitative investigations.
  • Formulation and testing of hypotheses.
  • Presentation and analysis of results
  • Discussion of results and listening to the views of others
  • Use of a wide range of sources of information
  • Communication of knowledge.

Homework

Students will normally be given one piece of written homework per week (of around 30-40 minutes) to explore a topic covered in class in more detail and/or to practise producing graphs, tables or diagrams with precision and care. Students will also be given a learning homework to consolidate knowledge of subject specific vocabulary and to clarify key ideas. It is recommended that students also spend 10 minutes per evening after each class on some daily revision to maximise understanding of topics.

Assessment

Assessment includes homework tasks, practical write-ups and end of unit tests as well as end of term exams in December and June of the academic year. There is no formal practical exam at KS3 but a student's ability to follow methodology, to work safely and with precision, is assessed by the teacher during all practical lessons.

Resources and Materials

The main textbook used is the Exploring Science for Year "working scientifically" 7. This covers each of the topics above as separate units. Students also follow related practical work in class for each topic, enabling them to see the application of the scientific method and the role of reliable evidence in coming to a conclusion about observations. Other textbooks and revision guides are used in some topics but are not set texts for students to work from independently at home.


Sociales

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 6º de Primaria, último de Educación Primaria de la LOE.
En nuestro programa de estudio se desarrollan los contenidos prescritos por el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid en sus currículos de Educación Primaria, siempre y cuando remitan exclusivamente al ejemplo español, ya que los otros contenidos referidos a la asignatura de Conocimiento del Medio están reflejados en el proyecto educativo del sistema británico.
El estudio de la Historia proporciona un conocimiento esencial del pasado que contribuye a la comprensión del presente. Asimismo, desarrolla una serie de capacidades y técnicas intelectuales propias del pensamiento abstracto y formal, tales como la observación, el análisis, la interpretación, la capacidad de compresión y el sentido crítico. El carácter vertebrador de la Historia, dentro del conjunto de las ciencias sociales, la convierte en eje ordenador del pensamiento y en fundamento de comprensión para todas las disciplinas vinculadas a la actividad humana. Por eso, dentro del ámbito de nuestra civilización occidental, la enseñanza de la Historia ha ocupado siempre un lugar preferente en la educación de los jóvenes.

Content

  • Organización política y territorial de España.
  • España y la Unión Europea.
  • El relieve de España.
  • El clima y los ríos de España

Skills

Queremos despertar en los alumnos la pasión por aprender y dotarles de las mejores herramientas para que puedan lograr su realización personal, ejerzan la ciudadanía activa, se incorporen a la vida adulta de manera satisfactoria y sean capaces de desarrollar un aprendizaje permanente a lo largo de la vida. Por todo ello, damos un tratamiento especial a competencias básicas que integren los diferentes aprendizajes y a que los estudiantes desarrollen sus habilidades lectoras, utilicen las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación e información, aprendan técnicas de estudio, mejoren la atención y desarrollen un razonamiento lógico que les ayude a interpretar y comprender el entorno y a encontrar diferentes soluciones para resolver problemas, sin olvidar la educación en valores.

Homework

Una vez a la semana. Consistirán fundamentalmente en aplicaciones de lo ya estudiado en clase, ejercicios prácticos, lectura, búsqueda de material e información, mapas, elaboración de esquemas y diagramas, uso de las nuevas tecnologías...

Assessment

Participación en clase, ejercicios escritos, debates, exposición oral de trabajos, pruebas escritas de evaluación ( tres evaluaciones) , uso de las nuevas tecnologías y juegos interactivos.

Resources and Materials

Atlas geográfico-histórico.

  • Material visual diverso (proyector digital), juegos interactivos
  • iPad (investigación, diccionario, Moodle, WebQuest,…)
  • Aplicaciones digitales (Keynote, TouchCast,…)
  • Libro de texto: libro-cuaderno elaborado por el departamento.
  • Presentaciones digitales elaboradas por el departamento.

Spanish

Introduction

Beginners Spanish:
Pupils who come into Year 7 from the Junior School already have knowledge of the Spanish language. Spanish is taught from Nursery all the way up to Year 13 at Runnymede College. The curriculum outlined in this guide is followed by those pupils who come into any year group in the Senior School with no previous knowledge of the language. They join their year group Spanish class, where they are very closely supported by their Spanish teacher (this can be done since the Spanish classes tend to be very small in numbers), but they also attend lunchtime classes with other pupils who are in their same situation. In this lunchtime classes the following programme of study is followed.

Content

(based on textbook Caminos 1)

  • Term 1:
    • Unit 1: Nuevos amigos
    • Unit 2: En clase
    • Unit 3: La familia
    • Unit 4: ¿Cómo eres?
    • Unit 5: Vamos al instituto
  • Term 2:
    • Unit 6: Mi ciudad
    • Unit 7: ¿Cómo es dónde vives?
    • Unit 8: Hogar, dulce hogar
    • Unit 9: Los ratos libres
    • Unit 10: La rutina
  • Term 3:
    • Unit 11: Comer fuera
    • Unit 12: ¡A comprar!
    • Unit 13: La salud
    • Unit 14: ¿Qué hiciste?
    • Unit 15: ¡Bienvenidos!

Grammar:
Verb ser, singular and plural, masculine and feminine, adjectives, adjective agreement, gustar, the present tense, al (to the), del (of the), prepositions, the simple future, tener que, querer, preferir, positive commands (tú, usted), direct object pronouns, me duele, hay que ,tener que, preterite tense of -ar, -er, -ir verbs, indirect object pronouns.

Skills

  • LISTENING: Understanding spoken language and exchanging information orally.
  • READING: Recognising Spanish handwriting, understanding written language. Reading for pleasure and information.
  • SPEAKING: Expressing opinions, responding to questions and contradicting a wrong answer, giving preferences, making suggestions and giving excuses.
  • WRITING: Writing a simple letter using a model, making descriptions and explanations, apologising, thanking and congratulating others.

Homework

  • One 40-minute written homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • One learning homework task is also given once a week.
  • Moreover, pupils must read at least one Spanish book at home every month. The teacher keeps a record of the books pupils read. Pupils can choose the books they want to read from either home or the school library. When they finish they are asked to write an account of the book in the target language.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment and testing rather than the weight being laid on one large exam. However, there are two official exam sessions: December and June.

Resources and Materials

  • Textbook, Caminos 1, Nelson Thornes.
  • ¡Viva la gramática!, Nelson Thornes.
  • Colección Aventura Joven, Elvira Sancho y Jordi Surís.
  • Library books kept in the department.

Spanish - Advanced

Introduction

Pupils who come into Year 7 from the Junior School already have knowledge of the Spanish language. Spanish is taught from Nursery all the way up to Year 13 at Runnymede College.This Curriculum guide has been designed for pupils with advanced linguistic skills, such as the 2018-2019 Spanish class. These are the aims of the Spanish department at Runnymede College:

  • To give a wider experience of the world, to provide the pupils with a tool to explore the world and take part in its development.
  • To help them learn about another socio-cultural reality.
  • To discover the world for personal fulfilment; to encourage independent learning.
  • To be introduced to alternative values, which will create an individual tolerant of different cultures, easily adaptable to the new demands of a fast-changing world.
  • To give an understanding of social-linguistic elements of behaviours and interactions.
  • To create an awareness of the functioning of a language and, by comparison, their own language.
  • To encourage an appreciation of literature, not merely for linguistic reasons, but also to develop both sensitivity to human situations and critical assessment.
  • To accept mistakes as an integral part of learning and to guide them through the process of overcoming difficulties.
  • To gain confidence in the knowledge that they are capable of learning a foreign language and function within a new system of communication.
  • To encourage the use of a wide range of technological accessories.

Content

Based on textbook Caminos 2, Nelson Thornes

  • Term 1
    • Comprensión lectora
    • Vocabulario/Temas: (1-4). La ropa, Los deportes, Tiempo libre, La comida, La rutina diaria, La familia.
    • Gramática: el determinante y el adjetivo, concordancia género y número, el comparativo/superlativo, adverbios de frecuencia.
    • Gramática: verbos: el presente continuo, el presente de verbos regulares, irregulares, reflexivos, verbos tipo gustar, construcciones impersonales con “se”.
    • Lectura en clase: Colección Aventura para tres y Colección Colega Lee
    • Lectura en casa: eligen un libro adecuado a su nivel (biblioteca)
  • Term 2
    • Comprensión lectora
    • Vocabulario/Temas: (5-7). De viaje, Las vacaciones, Las fiestas.
    • Gramática: los pronombres de CD y CI, adverbios para hablar del pasado: desde, desde hace, hace...
    • Gramática: verbos: pretérito perfecto, pretérito imperfecto, pretérito indefinido.
    • Lectura en clase: Lecturas graduadas
    • Lectura en casa: eligen un libro adecuado a su nivel (biblioteca)
  • Term 3
    • Comprensión lectora
    • Vocabulario/Temas (8-10). Nuestros proyectos, Nuestro mundo (el medio ambiente), Opiniones (cine, teatro, televisión)
    • Ortografía: puntuación
    • Gramática: adverbios de cantidad, frases de relativo
    • Gramática: verbos: el participio, el pluscuamperfecto, el imperativo afirmativo, futuro, condicional.
    • Lectura en clase: Lecturas graduadas
    • Lectura en casa: eligen un libro adecuado a su nivel (biblioteca)

Skills

  • LISTENING
  • READING
  • SPEAKING
  • WRITING

Homework

  • One 40-minute written homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • One learning homework task is also given once a week.
  • Moreover, pupils must read in Spanish at home. The teacher keeps a record of the books pupils read. Pupils can choose books from either home or the school library. When they finish they are asked to share their views with their classmates.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment and testing rather than the weight being laid on one large exam. However, there are two official exam sessions: December and June.

Resources and Materials

  • Caminos 2, Nelson Thornes
  • ¡Viva la gramática!, Nelson Thornes
  • Colección Aventuras para tres
  • Graded readings
  • Short stories
  • Library books kept in the department

Spanish - Lengua

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 6º de Primaria dentro del sistema español de la Enseñanza Obligatoria en el marco de la LOE. Nuestro programa de estudios desarrolla los contenidos que el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid han prescrito para los currículos de la Educación Primaria.
La principal finalidad de esta materia es aportar un nivel lingüístico más elevado a los alumnos españoles que se educan en el sistema británico, así como introducirles al mundo de la literatura y cultura españolas, enseñarles a valorar el español como cuarto idioma más hablado del mundo y darles la oportunidad de ser verdaderamente bilingües.
Se trabaja fundamentalmente en Lengua dando una gran importancia a la lectura y a la escritura de textos imaginativos y creativos; además, se estudian las bases de la Gramática (como fundamento para la posterior profundización en la etapa de la ESO) y se fomenta el conocimiento, desarrollo y ampliación de las destrezas lingüísticas de los alumnos (vocabulario, estructuras, dicción, expresión oral y escrita...)

Content

  • Comprensión lectora.
  • Expresión escrita.
  • Conocimiento de la lengua: léxico, ortografía y aspectos básicos de gramática.
  • Literatura: Se estudiarán algunos aspectos teóricos de la literatura pero se da prioridad a la lectura de textos en profundidad para que los alumnos adquieran habilidades de comprensión y análisis.
  • Se trabajarán en el aula los textos “Fernando el Temerario” de Jose Luis Velasco y “El otro árbol de Guernica” de L. de Castresana. Los alumnos leerán en casa de dos a tres libros de libre elección por trimestre, orientados por las profesoras.

Skills

En este curso se desarrollarán todos los aspectos que constituyen la competencia lingüística, por lo que se estudiará la lengua oral, la lengua escrita, la educación literaria y el conocimiento y uso de la lengua. El área además aborda contenidos cuyo desarrollo supondrá una inestimable cooperación al desarrollo de las restantes competencias.

Homework

Una vez a la semana. Consistirán fundamentalmente en aplicaciones de lo ya estudiado en clase, ejercicios prácticos, lectura, búsqueda de material e información y uso de las nuevas tecnologías.

Assessment

Participación en clase, ejercicios escritos, debates, exposición de trabajos, pruebas escritas de evaluación y lecturas.

Resources and Materials

  • Libro de texto: Lengua 6° de Primaria, Proyecto Savia, Editorial SM
  • Aplicaciones informáticas y uso del iPad.
  • Moodle. Foro de lectura.
  • Diccionarios.
  • Libros de lectura. Biblioteca.