Curriculum Guides Year 9

Art

Introduction

The Art Department offers a welcoming atmosphere where pupils can explore their own ideas and personality as well as satisfy the requirements of the course. We aim that all students develop creatively, independently and individually through a challenging range of drawing, painting and mixed media projects. They are given a balanced programme of art and design activities and are introduced to the work of artists, designers and craftsman, learning to use these influences to develop and inform their own practical work.
Pupils in Year 9 have two 40 minute periods per week.

Content

A variety of briefs will be given during the course.
They will fall into the following areas:

  • Observational study, developing skills using line, form, volume, light & shadow using a variety of media.
  • Interpretative study - Movement
  • Portraits - understanding the structure of the face.

Skills

The skills to be assessed during the course are:

  • Investigating and making
  • Knowledge and understanding

Homework

Pupils will be given homework each week. This could consist of finishing classwork, collecting reference material such as images, an observational study or research and analysis.

Assessment

There is continual assessment of all skills.

Resources and Materials

Individual Equipment:
Coloured pencils, black biro or pilot pen, eraser, 2B pencil, ruler.
The Art Department has a well-stocked, continually updated library of books and videos. Digital imagery is a resource used extensively in all aspects of the course.


Classical Civilisation

Introduction

Building on the previous year’s study of Ancient Greece, this course is designed to provide a general overview of the Roman Empire and its influence on later cultures and the present day.

Content

The course will assume a narrative approach, starting in the early days of the Roman Republic and concluding with the collapse of the western empire. Different themes will be examined throughout this historical narrative in order to give students the opportunity to experience the ancient Romans through a variety of learning styles and to introduce them to Roman history, art and architecture, literature, politics and geography in turn. Each of these themes will be examined categorically as the students journey through the chronology of Ancient Rome.
The course will equip students with key skills in collaboration, communication, creativity and critical thinking. It will refine methods in research, effective summarising and written expression. Moreover, it will undertake to inspire in students a love of classical history and culture, and an appreciation of the immense importance of Ancient Rome in the formation and development of the world in which they live.

Skills

The course will equip students with key skills in collaboration, communication, creativity and critical thinking. It will refine methods in research, effective summarising and written expression. Moreover, it will undertake to inspire in students a love of classical history and culture, and an appreciation of the immense importance of Ancient Rome in the formation and development of the world in which they live.
The subject is designed to be varied in its academic content and methods in order to engage a wide range of student abilities and interests. The course will equip students with key skills in collaboration, communication, creativity and critical thinking. It will refine methods in research, effective summarising and written expression.

Homework

Students can expect to receive homework assignments on a weekly basis. These will entail lesson preparation and consolidation, independent study, writing and research, and collaborative project work. Assignments will be varied in length and time commitment. Larger, formally assessed projects will be distributed evenly throughout the school year.

Assessment

Assessment for this course aims to be broad with an emphasis on varied learning styles. Continuous assessment will contribute strongly to the students’ final grade across all three terms. The course will facilitate peer assessment for project-based activities, and detailed formative and summative teacher assessment on selected other projects, essay writing and in tests and exams.

Resources and Materials

There is no key textbook for this course. Instead, there is an extensive and growing bank of resources that will be provided for students. These include excerpts, documents, academic articles, worksheets, structural notes and audio-visual resources.


Cultura

Introduction

At Runnymede College students sit the IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish exam at the end of Year 9. The “Cultura” Curriculum will help them be successful in the exam as they will explore many of the topics which are included in it.
These are the aims of the Spanish department at Runnymede College specifically included These are the aims of the Spanish department at Runnymede College specifically included in the subject “Cultura Española y de los países hispanohablantes”:

  • To give a wider experience of the world, to provide the pupils with a tool to explore the world and take part in its development.
  • To help them learn about another socio-cultural reality.
  • To discover the world for personal fulfilment; to encourage independent learning.
  • To be introduced to alternative values, which will create an individual tolerant of different cultures, easily adaptable to the new demands of a fast-changing world.
  • To give an understanding of social-linguistic elements of behaviours and interactions.
  • To encourage an appreciation of literature, not merely for linguistic reasons, but also to develop both sensitivity to human situations and critical assessment.
  • To accept mistakes as an integral part of learning and to guide them through the process of overcoming difficulties.
  • To gain confidence in the knowledge that they are capable of learning a foreign language and function within a new system of communication.
  • To encourage the use of a wide range of technological accessories.

Content

Term 1: 12 weeks

  • Tipos y Estereotipos (3 weeks)
    • Cultural stereotypes: introductory texts. Relate with culturally specific customs and habits.
    • Role Plays: sketches, drama plays.
    • Literature: Sombras del pasado.
  • Costumbres y Tradiciones (3 weeks)
    • Customs and traditions Literature: El laberinto de la soledad I y II (Pasajes).
  • La familia (3 weeks)
    • Different families’ lifestyles: La familia urbana y la familia rural. Changes within the concept of family: new families, new values.
    • Role Play: sketches, drama plays. (Pasajes).
    • Literature: El nieto (Pasajes).
  • La comida y la familia en el mundo hispano: recopilación (3 weeks)
    • Preparation of trivia on food and family
  • El hombre y la mujer en el mundo (3 weeks)
    • Past, Present and Future. From tradition to new lifestyles (Pasajes).
    • Women and men within the new family and laboral role models.
    • Literature: El delantal blanco I y II (TEATRO) (Pasajes)

Term 2: 12 weeks

  • Creencias y religión (3 weeks)
    • Different beliefs, tradition and religion: generational differences (Pasajes)
    • Al Andalus and Christian Spain during Medieval Times: muslims, christians and jews.
    • Our current world: Is it possible to live together?
    • Evangelical Christians in Latinoamerica.
    • Paranormal, supernatural realities. (Pasajes).
    • Literature: Espuma y nada más (Pasajes)
  • Algo de historia: el pueblo español (4 weeks)
    • Diversity: immigration and discrimination.
    • From past times to Spain nowadays: From Transition to Democracy; Spain in the European Union.
    • Literature: Hispanic legends.
  • Algo de historia: Hispanoamérica: el pueblo hispanoamericano (5 weeks)
    • From past times to present times (Pasajes).
    • Latin América nowadays: demography: population and migration (Pasajes).
    • Urban Latin América: big cities, new challenges. (Pasajes)

Term 3: 9 weeks

  • ARTE: La música en español (2 weeks)
    • Musical genres: tradition as identity.
    • Folk Music, singer-songwriters.
    • Relevant musicians.
  • ARTE: La pintura de artistas de España y Latinoamérica (2 weeks)
    • Main painters and main painting genres in the Hispanic World.
    • Main museums in the Hispanic World.
  • ARTE: otros géneros artísticos en Espańa y Latinoamérica. (2 weeks)
    • Other artistic genres: dance, drama, literature, architecture, sculpture, danza, teatro, literatura, arquitectura, photography.
    • Material: Todas las voces, Internet.
  • ARTE: el cine espańol y latinoamericano. (3 weeks)
    • Cinema: different genres.
    • Film: “El Bola”

Grammar taught indirectly:

Gender, indefinite and definite articles, demonstrative pronouns, desde hace, present tense, gustar + infinitives, gerund, uses of ser/estar, possessive adjectives and adverbs,agreement of adjectives, indirect object pronouns, revision of gustar, reflexive verbs, también/tampoco, future tense, imperatives, question words, por/para, interrogatives, direct object pronouns, preterite tense, regular and common irregular verbs, pretérito grave, revision of impersonal verbs, superlative. Revision of disjunctive pronouns, prepositional pronouns, revision of the preterite, position of direct and indirect pronouns, adverbs of quantity, imperfect tense, desde hace + imperfect tense, conditional tense, diminutives and augmentatives, possessive adjectives, using usted, using preterite and imperfect tenses, reflexive verbs in the preterite, the immediate future, the present continuous, revision of larger numbers, the imperfect continuous, using and avoiding the passive, pluperfect tense, reflexive verbs in the perfect tense and object pronouns, revision of comparatives with gustar, negative commands, subjunctive.

Skills

  • Speaking
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Homework

  • One 40-minute homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • At times pupils will need to work on their presentations at home.
  • Pupils must read in Spanish at home.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment. Assessment is also based on the quality and effort put on projects and presentations. There is no exam at the end of the term/year. The progress made in this subject will be reported together with the subject Spanish.

Resources and Materials

  • Libros de texto Pasajes Literatura and Cultura.
  • Todas las voces.
  • ¡Viva la gramática!, Hodder and Stoughton.
  • The key to Spanish grammar, Nelson Thornes
  • Vocabulary for GCSE Spanish, Nelson Thornes
  • Film: El Bola
  • Department webpage: www.runnymedespanish.weebly.com

English

Introduction

The teaching of English for first and second language speakers covers the entire area of language used for practical and expressive ends, and the domain of literature. The curriculum is, of necessity,more a description of skills, techniques and accomplishments than a body of knowledge.
There are five lessons each week and three groups – two parallel ability groups and a third smaller group for those students whose English has not reached a level of parity with their mother tongue. The intention is for students of this group to obtain a thorough grounding in English that will make them suitable candidates for the examination open to first language speakers in Years 11 and 13, IGCSEs, AS and A2 Levels.
Year 9 is the end of the National Curriculum’s Key Stage 3. Pupils in this age group are assessed internally through the written SAT examination and by Teacher Assessment. It marks the end of the early secondary cycle and is a transition year towards the IGCSE external assessment work.

Content

All pupils, in whatever group, will read a wide range of literature as well as non-fiction texts and media.
The range of literature will cover the three genres: poetry, prose fiction and drama.

  • Class readers in Year 9 are always works of fully fledged literature―not written for junior readers. Typical texts used as class readers in Year 9 include: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Roll Of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor and Animal Farm by George Orwell.
  • Grammar and Comprehension: Letts English Coursebook KS3. This book provides a wide range of readings grouped in themes. These lead on to discussion and writing opportunities.

Supplementary English:

In Year 9, supplementary English classes work towards the First Certificate Exam offered by the British Council. Attendance is compulsory for the lower group and optional for other pupils in Year 9. Supplementary English classes continue to focus on grammatical skills with the added benefit of achieving a formal qualification. Lessons are taught three times a week in the lunch hour.

Skills

The current National Curriculum, on which this guide is based, outlines an integrated programme of study built upon three Attainment Targets:

  • Speaking and Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Speaking and Listening

All pupils, in whatever group, will be given the opportunity to contribute talk of various kinds, adapting their speech to suit listeners and activity, and to develop as effective listeners.

Reading

In addition to the literature of the British Isles, pupils will be introduced to other literature in the English language. Some of the reading will be close study work. Independent reading, library use and a culture of literacy will be encouraged.
One lesson a week will be given over to independent reading. Pupils will have a book list appropriate to their year group and be expected to read some books from this list. These books are available form the school library. Pupils keep a reading record of the books they have read.

Writing

Pupils will be encouraged to write more confidently in a variety of styles and for a range of purposes and readers.
Over the year a wide variety of forms and styles will be taught and practised: among others, this will include letters, chronological accounts, biographies, stories, essays and reports.

Homework

There are two homeworks a week. Each homework should take 30 minutes. Homework examples: letter; empathetic essay; piece of creative writing; comprehension passage and questions; worksheet from Letts English textbook; book reviews and newspaper articles. Pupils will receive grammar exercises depending on the needs of the group.

Assessment

Students receive grades ( A-E ) for each piece of work. Staff write targets for the pupils as a standard part of marking. The examination at Christmas assesses the first term’s work. The Summer examination assesses the year’s work as a whole. Any movement from one group to another is usually made at Christmas and at the end of the year.

Resources and Materials

There is a large stock of supplementary material for classes and individual pupils. The library offers the pupils a wide range of reading material. The department also has over 150 DVDs and audio tapes.


French

Introduction

Languages are a key component of education at Runnymede College, with all students studying French up to IGCSE in Year 11 and a large number continuing in the Sixth Form. The study of French provides students with a lifelong skill in communicating in a widely spoken language of continued global importance, and the experience of doing so opens students up to a different culture and gives them the tools necessary to learn other languages in the future.
At Key Stage 3 the emphasis is on the acquisition of the vocabulary and structures necessary to describe the students' personal surroundings and interests. The key tenses required to refer to the past, present and future are introduced and the foundations are laid for the IGCSE course.
Pupils are set in Year 9: a slower (4), 2 middle (3 & 2) and a quicker (1) moving set All sets will still end up covering the extended section of the IGCSE syllabus by the end of Year 11. Some candidates will sit the exam in Year 10. All our students enter for all components at extended level (targeted grades B, A, A*). Pupils will be given an exam in June to determine their level at KS3. They usually get between level 5 and level 8. Pupils are given 3 lessons per week.

Content

Grammar

  • Term 1:
    • Revision present; Revision future; Revision perfect
    • Avoir; Être; Reflexive; Revision imperfect
  • Term 2:
    • Set C: Perfect + imperfect, pluperfect
    • Set A/B: Conditional, Second conditional
  • Term 3
    • Set C: Conditional; Second conditional
    • Set A/B: Conditional perfect; Future perfect; 3rd Conditional

Topics

  • Term 1
    • Reader: quelle famille
  • Term 2:
    • Set C: Tricolore 3 from unit 2: Paris; leisure activities; school
    • Set A/B: Tricolore 4 from unit 1: personal identification; geographical surroundings; travel/ transport
  • Term 3:
    • Set C: Events in past, present, future; lifestyle/ accidents; holidays
    • Set A/B: Future plans; daily routine; food; leisure; health; school and future

Skills

Equal importance will be given to the skills of:

  • Speaking
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing

Homework

We believe homework is of paramount importance in the learning process as it enables students to work on their own and consolidate their knowledge and to self-assess their progress. Homework is given twice a week, including a mixture of exercises and revision of recently studied vocabulary and grammar for test.

Assessment

Regular testing and assessment takes place each lesson. There is a departmental exam in November and a final exam in June.

Resources and Materials

The course from Year 7 to 11 is based on Tricolore books 1 to 4 (A & B), supplemented by readers, and specialised books on vocabulary and grammar. Use is made CDs.

  • Set C: Tricolore 3: textbook; copymasters; assessment pack; CDs; Grammar in action.
  • Set A/B:Tricolore 4: textbook; copymasters; assessment pack; CDs; Grammar in action.
  • Website: frenchoutofthebox.com / relevantideas.weebly.com

Geography

Introduction

Geography at Runnymede aims to nurture students' curiosity and sense of wonder about places. It helps young people understand the complex and ever-changing world we live in, helping them to explore the links between the diverse range of economies, societies and environments. It explores where places are, how places and landscapes are formed and how people and their environment interact. It encourages students to develop a geographical imagination that enables students to relate to other places and people, and to appreciate the cultures and perspectives of others. Geography encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues facing the world at present and in the future, encouraging students to become active and engaged citizens of our world.

Content

Year 9 Geography explores the natural (tectonic) and human hazards (climate change) affecting our world, and examines how we cope with them and the implications for the future. Students examine the increasing development gap found between the rich and poor, exploring the causes, problems and some potential solutions to poverty. Students also explore the dynamically changing world we live in, looking at globalisation and how it has and will change our world. Students look at tourism as an example of an industry that has changed as a result of globalisation.

Tourism - Students explore one of the world's growing industries, examining the positive and negative impacts of tourism.

Development - Students explore the development gaps between different countries, examine the effects and impact of varying levels of development and critically analyse the responses to poverty

Russia - Students explore the physical and human geography of this important country.

Plate Tectonics - Students explore the tectonic processes that affect our planet. Students identify and explain the location of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis as well as looking at the impacts and responses to such disasters.

Geography in the news - At the end of the year, students examine a number of topical Geographical events that have occurred over the course of the year.

Skills

  • To understand how sequences of events and activities in the physical world lead to changes in places, landscapes and societies.
  • To appreciate the differences and similarities between people, places, environments and cultures to inform their understanding of societies and economies.
To appreciate how people’s values and attitudes differ and may influence social, environmental, economic and political issues, and developing their own values and attitudes about such issues.
  • To explore the social, economic, environmental and political connections between places.
  • To understand the significance of interdependence in change, at all scales.
  • To understand the interactions between places and the networks created by flows of information, people and goods.
  • To understand that the physical and human dimensions of the environment are interrelated and together influence environmental change.
To explore sustainable development and its impact on environmental interaction and climate change.
  • To identify bias, opinion and abuse of evidence in sources when investigating issues.
  • To solve problems and make decisions to develop analytical skills and creative thinking about geographical issues.
  • To analyse and evaluate evidence, presenting findings to draw and justify conclusions.

Homework

Year 9 have a written homework every week. This could range from project work, research tasks, textbook work, worksheets to report writing. They are also expected to spend time revising and going over their class book notes.

Assessment

Students are assessed continuously, through questioning in class discussions, class work completed in their books and home work tasks too. Students will also have to prepare for an end of topic assessment which could be in the form of a test, essay, project or presentation. Students will also be assessed in their June exams.

Resources and Materials

  • School Geography website – www.schoolgeography.com
  • Keynote presentations and worksheets prepared by the teacher

History

Introduction

The History Dept aims to instil in all pupils a keen interest in the past and an enthusiasm for studying History:

  • By imparting the tools with which to research independently.
  • By exploring key phases of world History that should be meaningful and relevant to our student body.
  • By introducing students to a wide variety of areas of History, political, military, social and economic.
  • By encouraging independent analysis through debate and critical writing.
  • By developing cross curricular skills throughout each course.
  • By providing an enriching and rewarding curriculum that should prepare them for life at university and beyond.

Content

Winter Term:

  • Slavery
  • What drove the African Slave Trade?
  • Africa before slavery
  • The impact of slavery on Africa
  • The process of enslaving and transportation
  • Life in the Americas
  • Resistance - how enslaved Africans resisted
  • Abolition - the ending of the Slave Trade

Spring Term:

  • The Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions
  • What is a revolution?
  • Causes of the Industrialisation of the UK
  • Key individuals in the process, Wedgwood, Arkwright
  • The impact of change on the rural and urban working classes
  • Housing, education, health and reform of working conditions
  • The life of the Middle Classes
  • Rise and role of Empire

Summer Term:

  • orld War One
  • he causes of the First World War
  • rincipal methods of warfare on land, at sea and in the air
  • he domestic impact of the war
  • he role of technology in warfare

Skills

  • Independent reading and note taking
  • Effective selection and use of relevant evidence
  • Oral and written communication, including a range of written formats and debating styles
  • Evidence skills - use of primary and secondary sources, assessing gaps, utility, reliability
  • Use of IT for research and production of work
  • We aim to include one significant independent project per term
  • We aim to undertake one key educational visit per year
  • A wide variety of teaching methods are used.
  • These include individual reading and comprehension exercises, group work, discussion sessions, formal debates, presentations, and a variety of written tasks from evidence exercises to the production of full essays.
  • An individual or group project is undertaken for each e

Homework

  • Each group has three 40 minute periods per week.
  • Classes are taught by Form, in mixed ability groups.
  • Homework is set every week and should take approximately 30-45 minutes

Assessment

Assessment is continuous, made up of class work, homework and formal exams.
Feedback to pupils is integral to the department.

Resources and Materials

  • Key Texts: Black People’s of the Americas by Bob Rees
  • Peace and War: SHP by Shepard and Reid
  • Supplementary resources:
  • Alex Hayley, Roots
  • The biographies of Olaudah Equiano and John Newton
  • Key primary sources from the Liverpool museums service
  • Digging Deeper, Britain 1750-1900
  • Variety of video clips
  • Key primary sources
  • Moodle

Latin

Introduction

All pupils in Year 9 normally study Latin unless they have found Latin difficult or are new to the school and have not done Latin before. The course involves learning the language of the Romans and studying their world. The broad aims of teaching this subject are to develop understanding of how languages work and to improve pupils’ own language-use, to encourage precision of thought, to promote knowledge of an ancient culture which has had a great influence on the modern world, particularly in Europe, and to encourage awareness of cultural variety and change. (Those who have found it difficult will do Classical Studies; newcomers who have not studied Latin will be doing an intensive course based on Books 1 and 2 of the Cambridge Latin Course - see the information for Years 7 and 8)

Content

The work in Year 9 (and up to Year 10 of the GCSE course) is based closely on the Cambridge Latin Course. There are two distinct parts to the work, but they are closely linked. The narrative passages in the language sections are the basis for work on various aspects of ancient life. A certain amount of additional material is included in the course.
A booklet is issued in September which has language and Roman life worksheets. (This should be kept with their exercise books.)
There may be other work on Roman history.
In some years a play is performed by members of this year-group and some lesson-time is used for rehearsals and other preparations. This year the play is likely to take place in early February.

Language: Pupils study Stages 19 and 20 of Book 2 and Stages 21 to 26 of Book 3 of the Cambridge Latin Course (4th edition). The language is learnt by means of reading stories, doing exercises and learning vocabulary and endings.

  • The following are the principal grammar topics. Pupils need to know any endings and how they are used:
    • Book 2
      • Revision of nouns, introduction of neuters
      • hic, haec, hoc and is, ea, id (and ille, illa, illud)
      • Imperative
      • Present Participle
    • Book 3
      • Revision of verbs – Indicative, Infinitive, Imperative
      • Perfect Participles (Active and Passive)
      • Concept of Active and Passive verbs
      • Adverb formation
      • Uses of the Genitive Case
      • cum (when) and the Imperfect and Pluperfect Subjunctives
      • Indirect questions
      • Purpose Clause with ut
  • Great stress in the course is placed on the ability to understand continuous Latin and the reading and translating of stories in class and occasionally for homework plays a major part in the work.
  • A certain amount of work on general linguistic concepts continues to be covered. For example, there is discussion of different voices of verbs (active and passive) and the moods of verbs (e.g. subjunctives and indicatives).
  • At the end of each stage is a checklist of vocabulary to be learnt. Vocabulary revision will be done at different times of the year.

Roman life: Each stage contains information on a different topic on the ancient world. The end of Book 2 is set in Alexandria under the Romans. Book 3 is about the Romans and Britain, but there is particular emphasis placed on religion and the army. The topics covered in Year 9 are:

  • Worship of Isis
  • Greek Science and Medicine
  • Roman Bath
  • Religion, including curses
  • Travel, in particular by road
  • The legionary soldiers

Roman history: Some work may be done, first on the early history of Rome and the Etruscans, and then on the wars between the Romans and the Carthaginians. (In years where a play for the class is being prepared for in lessons this history work will be reduced or even not done.)

Skills

Pupils will need to understand and learn grammatical concepts, use written language carefully, analyse precisely and learn vocabulary - which may improve their knowledge of languages which have Latinate vocabulary; they will read and learn about Roman culture, appreciating and understanding differences between that world and their own experience, and become increasingly aware of the importance of sources of knowledge and their limitations in studying an ancient culture.

Homework

Homework is normally set once a week. Many of the homeworks will involve learning vocabulary or endings already introduced in class. The rest will be exercises, translation, questions about Roman life and finishing work on Roman history.

Assessment

Assessment will be by regular tests over the year and the school examinations.

  • Language: They will be assessed on knowledge and understanding of grammar and ability to translate and understand stories.
    • Grammar: there will be tests and exercises to assess pupils’ progress and to emphasise the need for revision.
    • Translation: written translation of stories and questions in English about them will be used to test ability. Vocabulary which has been learnt will be used in these stories.
  • Roman life and history: Knowledge and understanding of the various areas of Roman life covered during the year will be assessed by worksheets done in class or for homework. Pupils need to be aware of the different types of evidence on which our knowledge is based, and to be able to make comparisons with the modern world. Longer pieces of work on Roman history will be assessed too.

Resources and Materials

The Cambridge Latin Course Books 2 and 3 are the major textbooks. Slides and photographs are used to illustrate aspects of the work on the ancient world. Some videos on the Roman occupation of Britain will be seen. For Roman history “These were the Romans” is used. Original sources may be read in translation and other accounts may be read; pupils may be expected to find more information from books in the school library and in the classics library, and from the internet.
"SALVE", the Runnymede Classics website, has extra information on Roman life topics studied, photographs, exercises to practise grammar and vocabulary, and help with exam revision. It can be accessed by going to http://salve.runnymede-college.com. It contains links to other sites, in particular the Cambridge Latin Course website and the BBC “Romans” site.


Mathematics

Introduction

In Year 9 a number of IGCSE topics are introduced to familiarise the students with the demands and expectations of the Cambridge IGCSE course, which is designed for all pupils to gain:

  • The development of their mathematical knowledge
  • Confidence, by developing a feel for numbers, patterns and relationships
  • An ability to consider and solve problems and present and interpret results
  • Skills in communication and reasoning using mathematical concepts
  • A solid foundation for further study.

Within the department our aim is to give all pupils the opportunity to develop their potential to the full, and to achieve this our students will be taught in mixed attainment classes and encouraged to work at a pace which is appropriate for them. The exception to this is the pupils we feel would benefit from working towards the Core level IGCSE exam in Year 10 to help students to gain confidence and secure a grade C before the pressure of Year 11. Those students will receive more individualised instruction in Year 9 and 10, and then will continue to work towards the Extended level examinations in Year 11.
We put a high emphasis on effort, involvement and risk-taking. Mistakes are embraced and encouraged as part of the learning process, and we strive to cultivate a safe and engaging environment for all students to reach their potential. The Mathematics team has carefully planned differentiated resources to ensure that every child has the same opportunities to make progress, and that appropriate support and challenge is available in every lesson.

Content

In Year 9 students review and build on the content introduced in the KS3 curriculum and continue to work on developing mathematical skills in all four of the key areas; Number, Shape, Algebra and Data Handling. New more challenging IGCSE topics are also introduced, and students start to familiarise themselves with how content is examined at this level.
The full topic schedule for this year can be found on the department website, under IGCSE, Year 9: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/students_year_9_sow_2019-20.pdf

Skills

Students are examined on AO1 and AO2 skills in the Mathematics IGCSE. AO1 marks are rewarded for demonstrating knowledge of mathematical techniques and skills required for this that we work on in Year 9 include estimation, calculation, use of a calculator, and using mathematical instruments. AO2 marks are rewarded for applying mathematical techniques to solve problems and the skills we focus on here are working logically, recognising patterns, and analysis of information.
A full breakdown of all the skills taught within the IGCSE syllabus can be found in the IGCSE information pack on the department website: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/324830-learner-guide-for-cambridge-igcse-mathematics-0580-.pdf

Homework

Homework is set on a weekly basis and will either be related to the content covered in class during that week or it will be a review task to give pupils the opportunity consolidate their understanding of a previously taught topic and enhance their memory of it. It will often be set from the Practice Book or the class textbook (which students can use their iPad to take photos of), but sometimes may be a worksheet or a pack of exam style questions.
Students will always be given optional extra challenge tasks so that they are able to challenge themselves appropriately. We have high expectations of effort and students will be graded on this for every piece of homework that is marked by the teacher. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Students at Runnymede receive five, forty minute, periods a week for mathematics. Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on homework tasks.
Students will be formally tested in class approximately once per half term. Test timings are outlined in the schedule link above. All assessments will test material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research.

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the appropriate Practice Book (Core or Extended) to support their studies at home. This can be used for homework and revision purposes and should be returned at the end of the IGCSE course.
In lessons students will have access to the full IGCSE textbook published by Cambridge University Press specifically for the Cambridge IGCSE syllabus.
Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website under IGCSE, Year 9.
In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Music

Introduction

At Runnymede the pupils develop their understanding and enjoyment of music by learning how it is constructed, produced and influenced.
The aim in key stage 3 stage is to extend pupils' musical experience and knowledge, and develop their appreciation of the richness of different styles of music. Music appreciation is a part of class music and pupil performances are staged within the school. A wide variety of instrumental classes are available including piano, violin, viola, guitar, flute, clarinet, saxophone and percussion. Runnymede is a recognised centre for the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music exams and pupils who wish to take these exams can take them in school on two occasions during the school year.

Content

  • Jazz: the African influence - its beginnings, growth and spread.
  • Score Reading, starting with single line scores to chamber music
  • Orchestral brass and percussion instruments;
  • Rondos and recurring structures.
  • Twelve bar blues improvisation;
  • History
  • Binary and ternary form - tempo terms;
  • Broken chords and arpeggios.
  • Composing based on a four bar phrase.
  • Composing in various genres, using composing apps.

Skills

Two main skills are developed throughout the Key Stage:

  • Performing and Composing
    In this area pupils are taught to:
    • Control sounds made by the voice and a range of tuned, and untuned instruments.
    • Perform with others, and develop awareness of audience, venue and occasion.
    • Compose in response to a variety of stimuli, and explore, a range of resources, e.g. voices, instruments, sounds from the environment.
    • Communicate musical ideas to others.
    • Gain flexibility in their voices through vocal training and breathing.
  • Listening and Appraising
    Here pupils are taught to:
    • Listen to, and develop understanding of music from different times and places, applying this knowledge to their own work;
    • Respond to, and evaluate, live performances and recorded music, including their own and others' compositions and performances.
  • Composing:
    • Pupils compose using the iPad and keyboards with guitar.
    • Mainly Garage Band is used, but a variety of other apps have been added now.

The topics chosen in Year 9 to develop theses skills are.

  • Vibrations - instruments; duration, pitch, volume experimenting with melodic and percussive instruments.
  • Instrument shapes and sizes; how they produce sound.
  • The keyboard and how the pitch of other instruments is related.
  • Musical codes; pulse, tempo, rhythm; crotchets and quavers and general musical notation.
  • Folk traditions, including performing and singing music from different countries.
  • Mixing rhythms - ostinato, round,and drone in both modern and classical music.
  • Early music; medieval instruments - minims; stave lines and spaces;
  • Word rhythms - accents and time; dotted notes.

Homework

Music theory related to the music played in class.
Music history background to pieces listened to in class.
Project work on topics introduced in class.
Composing based on chord sequences initiated in class.

Now that iPads may be taken home, some research is given on:

  • History of music
  • Work related to composing in class

Assessment

Assessment consists of classroom performances as solos and in groups. Short evaluations take place throughout the year, with full performances at the end of term or the school year. Score reading is tested periodically by written tests in class. Project work is brought in and graded according to the guidelines given.

Resources and Materials

Pupils have a manuscript and A4 exercise book to keep a record of classwork In addition they need to bring with them to each lesson a folder to keep the course sheets given throughout the year.

INTERNET BASED RESOURCES

The ipad and internet based resources including www.philharmonia.co.uk, Grovemusiconline (oxfordmuisconline.com), cmuse.org, slideplayer.com

TEXT BOOKS

The Music express, Opus and Cambridge Music series of books.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Instruments: piano, keyboards, acoustic, electric and bass guitars, ukuleles, violins, recorders (bass, treble and descant), percussion from drum kits to clave, tuned percussion including glockenspiels, xylophones and chime bars.


Physical Education

Introduction

Physical education is an important part of education at Runnymede College. The objectives of PE include the development of one's motor and social abilities, the promotion of the importance of physical fitness and the encouragement of budding talent in sports.
PE also aims to provide a daily time for some physical activity for the students. The physical training class, as it is also called, involves sports, games, exercise and most importantly, a break from the sedentary learning indoors.
One of the other important objectives of physical education is to instil in students the values and skills of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Daily physical activity promotes an awareness of health and well-being among students. It boosts them to engage in physical activities on a daily basis. It promotes them to lead a healthy life in adulthood. The sports, which are a part of a physical education class, also help in developing motor skills in children.

Content

Pupils are given 2 lessons per week in a double class.

  • Term 1:
    • Unit 1: Fitness
    • Unit 2: Swimming
    • Unit 3: Hockey
    • Unit 4: Volleyball
  • Term 2:
    • Unit 5: Athletics
  • Term 3:
    • Unit 6: Badminton
    • Unit 7: Kickball / Cricket
    • Unit 8: First Aid

Skills

Equal importance will be given to the skills with different activities and exercises.

  • Selecting and Using Whole-body Skills and Physical Skills:
    • Tactics
    • Techniques
    • Strategies
  • Mental Capacities:
    • Creativity
    • Determination
    • Solving Problems (techniques)
    • Active lifestyles and healthy
    • Confidence

Homework

There is no homework except If a pupil is unable to do PE classes in a particular unit (because they have a medical problem: allergy to something or injury). In this case they will be asked to do homework about this unit.

Assessment

Assessment in PE, is concerned primarily with the observation and recording of achievement in the practical context. It should be a continuous activity, blended in as part of normal teaching. The main method of gaining evidence of achievement is by direct observation of:

  • The physical skill of ability of the pupil (during each class).
  • The way in which the pupil has selected and organised their response (during each class with the effort and involvement).
  • The recognition and appreciation by the pupil of performance of themselves and others (at the end of each class and unit, with different events or tests).

Resources and Materials

Equipment: pupils should bring their PE-kit (shorts, T-shirt and trainers) and for swimming they should bring their PE-kit and their swimming things (swim cup, swimming suit, flip-flops and towel).


Science

Introduction

In Year 9 we teach Physics, Chemistry and Biology as separate subjects. Each class has one double period of each per week during which pupils do a considerable amount of practical work, backed up by the appropriate theory. All classes take place in a laboratory. The courses of study in all 3 subjects follow Key Stage 3 of the National Curriculum but augment this with additional material to provide suitable challenges for more able pupils and to prepare them for the next level: IGCSE.
We also start iGCSEs for Biology and Chemistry in term 3. The introductory units also help pupils make their option choices for the next year.

Content

During Key Stage 3, students will have the opportunity to begin to understand how scientists think about and describe the world we live in. They will appreciate the importance of scientific ideas to explain what happens around them, and they will encounter applications of Science.
Chemistry topics include: properties of metals; reactions of metals with water and acids; reactions of acids with metal oxides and carbonates and with alkalis; the reactivity series; corrosion; extraction of metals from their ores; environmental chemistry. Throughout these topics, pupils learn how to use chemical formulae and balanced chemical equations. The introductory topics for iGCSE are states of matter, separation techniques and atomic structure.
Physics topics include: forces and movement; measuring velocity; acceleration and the factors affecting it; air resistance and terminal speed; forces on objects in equilibrium; the principle of moments.
In the first term in Biology we look at Inheritance and simple genetic crosses in humans are studied. Environmental influences on variation, selective breeding and animal welfare issues are also considered.
In the second term we continue the study of body systems by looking at movement in humans, including antagonistic muscles, different types of joints and skeletal structure. The nervous system is touched on with emphasis on important sense organs, namely the eye, ear and skin. Plants, leaf structure and photosynthesis are studied in the latter part of term two and provide an introduction to the ecology topic. In the third term the GCSE topics of characteristics of living things and classification of organisms are taught.

Skills

Skills will be developed in the areas of:

  • Accurate observation.
  • Planning and carrying out qualitative and quantitative investigations.
  • Formulation and testing of hypotheses.
  • Presentation and analysis of results
  • Discussion of results and listening to the views of others
  • Use of a wide range of sources of information
  • Communication of knowledge.

Homework

Homework is set each week and is usually of a written nature. It may include work from the textbook, extensions of the practical work done in class, or preparation for work in the following week. Homework should normally take approximately 30 minutes. From time to time, weekly or additional learning homework will also be set.

Assessment

Assessment includes homework tasks, practical write-ups and end of unit tests as well as end of term exams in December and June of the academic year. There is no formal practical exam at KS3 but a student's ability to follow methodology, to work safely and with precision, is assessed by the teacher during all practical lessons.

Resources and Materials

The course follows the Exploring Science for Year 9 "working scientifically" which has it’s own text book covering year 9 biology chemistry and physics. The scheme also suggests and provides support materials for practical work which is appropriate to all the topics covered.
Students also carry out experiments where relevant and this builds on their practical skills from years 7 and 8 and hopefully captures their interest by bringing the subject to life.


Sociales

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 2º de la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO).
En nuestro programa de estudio se desarrollan los contenidos prescritos por el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid en sus currículos de Educación Secundaria, siempre y cuando remitan exclusivamente al ejemplo español, ya que los otros contenidos referidos a la asignatura de Sociales están reflejados en el proyecto educativo del sistema británico.

Content

  • Historia de la Península Ibérica durante la Edad Media.
  • Los orígenes de la Edad Moderna: Reyes Católicos, grandes exploraciones, América precolombina, el nuevo Estado moderno.
  • La Monarquía Hispánica: Carlos I, Felipe II, conquista y colonización de América, economía y sociedad en América, crisis de la Monarquía Hispánica.

Skills

Queremos despertar en los alumnos la pasión por aprender y dotarles de las mejores herramientas para que puedan lograr su realización personal, ejerzan la ciudadanía activa, se incorporen a la vida adulta de manera satisfactoria y sean capaces de desarrollar un aprendizaje permanente a lo largo de la vida. Por todo ello, damos un tratamiento especial a competencias básicas que integren los diferentes aprendizajes y a que los estudiantes desarrollen sus habilidades lectoras, utilicen las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación e información, aprendan técnicas de estudio, mejoren la atención y desarrollen un razonamiento lógico que les ayude a interpretar y comprender el entorno y a encontrar diferentes soluciones para resolver problemas, sin olvidar la educación en valores.

Homework

Dos períodos a la semana.
Una vez a la semana. Consistirán fundamentalmente en aplicaciones de lo ya estudiado en clase, ejercicios prácticos, búsqueda de material e información, mapas, elaboración de esquemas y diagramas...

Assessment

Participación en clase, trabajos colaborativos, ejercicios escritos, debates, exposición oral de trabajos, elaboración de webquest en equipo, pruebas escritas de evaluación ( tres evaluaciones) y juegos interactivos.

Resources and Materials

Atlas geográfico-histórico.

  • Libro de texto: libro-cuaderno elaborado por el departamento.
  • Presentaciones digitales elaboradas por el departamento.
  • Atlas geográfico-histórico.
  • Material visual diverso: pizarra interactiva, juegos interactivos, uso de internet (Google Earth, maps, presentaciones...)
  • iPad (diccionario, investigación, WebQuest, ...)

Spanish

Introduction

At Runnymede College students sit the IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish exam at the end of Year 9.
These are the aims of the Spanish department at Runnymede College:

  • To give a wider experience of the world, to provide the pupils with a tool to explore the world and take part in its development.
  • To help them learn about another socio-cultural reality.
  • To discover the world for personal fulfilment; to encourage independent learning.
  • To be introduced to alternative values, which will create an individual tolerant of different cultures, easily adaptable to the new demands of a fast-changing world.
  • To give an understanding of social-linguistic elements of behaviours and interactions.
  • To create an awareness of the functioning of a language and, by comparison, their own language.
  • To encourage an appreciation of literature, not merely for linguistic reasons, but also to develop both sensitivity to human situations and critical assessment.
  • To accept mistakes as an integral part of learning and to guide them through the process of overcoming difficulties.
  • To gain confidence in the knowledge that they are capable of learning a foreign language and function within a new system of communication.
  • To encourage the use of a wide range of technological accessories.

Content

  • Term 1:
    • Textos periodísticos (parte II “libro de Lengua” 2º ESO)
    • Preparación para el examen de IGCSE, especialmente conversación general examen oral.
    • Lectura: Un hombre con un tenedor en una tierra de sopas, Jordi Sierra i Fabra
    • Lectura en casa: Relato de un náufrago, Gabriel García Márquez
  • Term 2:
    • Textos expositivos (material Lengua 2º ESO)
    • Preparación para el examen de IGCSE
    • Lectura en clase: Au Revoir Marie, Tina Olivares
  • Term 3:
    • Textos argumentativos (material Lengua 2º ESO)
    • Preparación final y examen de IGCSE
    • Lectura: El príncipe de la Niebla, Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    • Lectura en casa: Nunca seré tu héroe, María Menéndez-Ponte

Grammar:
Gender, indefinite and definite articles, demonstrative pronouns, desde hace, present tense, gustar + infinitives, gerund, uses of ser/estar, possessive adjectives and adverbs,agreement of adjectives, indirect object pronouns, revision of gustar, reflexive verbs, también/tampoco, future tense, imperatives, question words, por/para, interrogatives, direct object pronouns, preterite tense, regular and common irregular verbs, pretérito grave, revision of impersonal verbs, superlative. Revision of disjunctive pronouns, prepositional pronouns, revision of the preterite, position of direct and indirect pronouns, adverbs of quantity, imperfect tense, desde hace + imperfect tense, conditional tense, diminutives and augmentatives, possessive adjectives, using usted, using preterite and imperfect tenses, reflexive verbs in the preterite, the immediate future, the present continuous, revision of larger numbers, the imperfect continuous, using and avoiding the passive, pluperfect tense, reflexive verbs in the perfect tense and object pronouns, revision of comparatives with gustar, negative commands, subjunctive.

Skills

  • LISTENING: To respond to a range of factual and imaginative speech, drawing inferences. To recognise and comment on how spoken language varies according to the speaker, audience, purpose, situation and topic.
  • SPEAKING: To talk freely, with little formal error, using a wide range of language in discussion about factual and non-factual material. To express a range of responses and attitudes to events, issues and opinions, developing an argument and giving reasons.
  • READING: To summarise, comment on and discuss contrasting points of view and the main themes in a range of factual and non-factual texts.
  • WRITING: To choose the appropriate form of writing for a particular task, organising content and ideas to produce a coherent and largely accurate piece of writing.

Homework

  • One sixty-minute homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • Past papers (IGCSE)
  • Pupils must read at least one Spanish book every month at home.

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment and testing rather than the weight being laid on one large exam. However, there are two official exam sessions, December and June.
Moreover, at the end of Year 9 pupils sit the IGCSE Spanish as a Foreign Language exam.

Resources and Materials

  • Libros de texto 2º ESO (Bruño, Casals, SM)
  • ¡Viva la gramática!, Hodder and Stoughton
  • The key to Spanish grammar, Nelson Thornes
  • Vocabulary for GCSE Spanish, Nelson Thornes
  • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM
  • Un hombre con un tenedor en una tierra de sopas, Jordi Sierra i Fabra
  • Relato de un náufrago, Gabriel García Márquez
  • Au Revoir Marie, Tina Olivares
  • Nunca seré tu héroe, María Menéndez-Ponte
  • El príncipe de la niebla, Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Spanish - Advanced

Introduction

At Runnymede College students sit the IGCSE Foreign Language Spanish exam at the end of Year 9.
These are the aims of the Spanish department at Runnymede College:

  • To give a wider experience of the world, to provide the pupils with a tool to explore the world and take part in its development.
  • To help them learn about another socio-cultural reality.
  • To discover the world for personal fulfilment; to encourage independent learning.
  • To be introduced to alternative values, which will create an individual tolerant of different cultures, easily adaptable to the new demands of a fast-changing world.
  • To give an understanding of social-linguistic elements of behaviours and interactions.
  • To create an awareness of the functioning of a language and, by comparison, their own language.
  • To encourage an appreciation of literature, not merely for linguistic reasons, but also to develop both sensitivity to human situations and critical assessment.
  • To accept mistakes as an integral part of learning and to guide them through the process of overcoming difficulties.
  • To gain confidence in the knowledge that they are capable of learning a foreign language and function within a new system of communication.
  • To encourage the use of a wide range of technological accessories

Content

Based on textbook 1º ESO Editorial Casals.

  • Term 1
    • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM (Unidades 1-4)
    • Mañana 3 Curso de Español, Editorial Anaya (Unidades 2-4)
    • Ortografía
    • Preparación para el examen de IGCSE, especialmente conversación general examen oral.
    • Lectura: Un hombre con un tenedor en una tierra de sopas, Jordi Sierra i Fabra
    • Lectura en casa: Relato de un náufrago, Gabriel García Márquez
  • Term 2
    • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM (Unidades 5-7)
    • Mañana 3 Curso de Español, Editorial Anaya (Unidades 5-6)
    • Ortografía
    • Preparación para el examen de IGCSE
    • Lectura en clase: Au Revoir Marie, Tina Olivares
    • Lectura en casa: libro de libre elección
  • Term 3
    • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM (Unidades 8-10)
    • Mañana 3 Curso de Español, Editorial Anaya (Unidades 7-8)
    • Ortografía
    • Preparación final y examen de IGCSE
    • Lectura: El príncipe de la Niebla, Carlos Ruiz Zafón
    • Lectura en casa: Nunca seré tu héroe, María Menéndez-Ponte

Grammar:
Gender, indefinite and definite articles, demonstrative pronouns, desde hace, present tense, gustar + infinitives, gerund, uses of ser/estar, possessive adjectives and adverbs,agreement of adjectives, indirect object pronouns, revision of gustar, reflexive verbs, también/tampoco, future tense, imperatives, question words, por/para, interrogatives, direct object pronouns, preterite tense, regular and common irregular verbs, pretérito grave, revision of impersonal verbs, superlative. Revision of disjunctive pronouns, prepositional pronouns, revision of the preterite, position of direct and indirect pronouns, adverbs of quantity, imperfect tense, desde hace + imperfect tense, conditional tense, diminutives and augmentatives, possessive adjectives, using usted, using preterite and imperfect tenses, reflexive verbs in the preterite, the immediate future, the present continuous, revision of larger numbers, the imperfect continuous, using and avoiding the passive, pluperfect tense, reflexive verbs in the perfect tense and object pronouns, revision of comparatives with gustar, negative commands, subjunctive.

Skills

  • LISTENING: To respond to a range of factual and imaginative speech, drawing inferences. To recognise and comment on how spoken language varies according to the speaker, audience, purpose, situation and topic.
  • READING: To summarise, comment on and discuss contrasting points of view and the main themes in a range of factual and non-factual texts.
  • SPEAKING: To talk freely, with little formal error, using a wide range of language in discussion about factual and non-factual material. To express a range of responses and attitudes to events, issues and opinions, developing an argument and giving reasons.
  • WRITING: To choose the appropriate form of writing for a particular task, organising content and ideas to produce a coherent and largely accurate piece of writing.

Homework

  • One sixty-minute homework is given to pupils once a week.
  • Past papers (IGCSE)
  • Pupils must read in Spanish at home. The teacher keeps a record of the books pupils read. Pupils can choose books from either home or the school library. When they finish they are asked to share their views with their classmates

Assessment

Continuous assessment is carried out, both of classwork and homework, in both oral and written forms. Preference is given to frequent assessment and testing rather than the weight being laid on one large exam. However, there are two official exam sessions, December and June.
Moreover, at the end of Year 9 pupils sit the IGCSE Spanish as a Foreign Language exam.

Resources and Materials

  • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM
  • Mañana 3 Curso de Español, Editorial Anaya
  • Libros de texto 2º ESO (Bruño, Casals, SM)
  • ¡Viva la gramática!, Hodder and Stoughton
  • The key to Spanish grammar, Nelson Thornes
  • Vocabulary for GCSE Spanish, Nelson Thornes
  • Leer, comprender y escribir, 2º ESO, Editorial SM
  • Un hombre con un tenedor en una tierra de sopas, Jordi Sierra i Fabra
  • Relato de un náufrago, Gabriel García Márquez
  • Au Revoir Marie, Tina Olivares
  • Nunca seré tu héroe, María Menéndez-Ponte
  • El príncipe de la niebla, Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Spanish - Lengua

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 2º de la ESO dentro del sistema español de la Enseñanza Obligatoria en el marco de la LOE. Nuestro programa de estudios desarrolla los contenidos que el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid han prescrito para los currículos de la Educación Secundaria Obligatoria.
La principal finalidad de esta materia es aportar un nivel lingüístico más elevado a los alumnos españoles que se educan en el sistema británico, así como introducirles al mundo de la literatura y cultura españolas, enseñarles a valorar el español como cuarto idioma más hablado del mundo y darles la oportunidad de ser verdaderamente bilingües.
Además de alcanzar los objetivos correspondientes a la formación obligatoria básica de la ESO, se trabaja la lingüística, reflexionando sobre los mecanismos de la comunicación humana, de manera crítica y analítica, estudiando la estructura de la lengua española con la gramática y estudiando la literatura española, no desde un punto de vista meramente teórico sino a través de la lectura directa y completa de las distintas obras, dirigida por las profesoras, identificando su trasfondo histórico y cultural, apoyado en trabajos individuales, de grupo, material audiovisual y digital... Para ello, se eligen libros de lectura apropiados a la edad, procurando que sean temas motivadores y que fomenten en los alumnos el placer de leer.

Content

Comunicación: noticia, reportaje, artículos periodísticos.
Conocimiento de la lengua: gramática y ortografía.
Literatura. En esta sección se estudiarán algunos aspectos teóricos de la literatura, pero se dará prioridad a la lectura de textos en profundidad,para que los alumnos adquieran habilidades de comprensión y análisis de los textos literarios así como de los rasgos que caracterizan a sus autores, sus géneros y sus épocas.

  • Se hará una lectura completa, guiada y comentada en clase de varios textos:
    • Un hombre con un tenedor en una tierra de sopas. Jordi Sierra i Fabra (narrativa), primer trimestre.
    • Au revoir, Marie, (teatro), segundo trimestre
    • Relatos cortos, autores españoles e hispanoamericanos (narrativa), tercer trimestre:
    • Los celosos, Nacha, Siete Cartas…
  • y en casa:
    • El náufrago. Gabriel García Márquez (narrativa), primer trimestre, más otro libro de libre elección.
    • Nunca seré tu héroe, (narrativa), segundo trimestre.
    • El príncipe de la niebla, Ruiz Zafón (narrativa), tercer trimestre.
    • Taller de textos periodísticos.
    • Taller de poesía
    • Taller de textos expositivos y argumentativos (investigación)

Skills

Los alumnos adquirirán todos los elementos de la competencia comunicativa tanto a nivel oral como escrito y conocimientos del lenguaje que les permitirá relacionarse con el mundo que les rodea, todo lo cual contribuirá al desarrollo de su autoestima y de otras competencias ligadas con otras materias y actitudes.

Homework

Una vez a la semana. Consistirán fundamentalmente en aplicaciones de lo ya estudiado en clase, ejercicios prácticos, lectura, búsqueda de material e información, uso de las nuevas tecnologías...

Assessment

Participación en clase, ejercicios escritos, debates, exposición de trabajos, pruebas escritas de evaluación y lecturas.

Resources and Materials

  • Libro de texto: Editorial Bruño. 2º ESO.
  • Diccionarios.
  • Libros de lectura. Biblioteca.
  • Material fotocopiado.
  • iPad: diccionario, recursos digitales, investigación.
  • Pizarra digital.