Curriculum Guides Year 12

Art

Introduction

The AS and A Levels are now linear qualifications, so that all student work will be submitted and assessed at the end of the course.
AS Art & Design is a completely stand-alone course. This means that if a student does the AS and then decides to go on to do the A Level, the mark achieved at AS will not count towards their A Level mark and grade.
The courses offer more flexibility to students. Students can choose only AS in year 12. If they then decide to do the full A Level, they can do the A Level in one year. The full A Level is now a 2 year course.
A Level incorporates and builds on the aims of GCSE Art and Design but requires something more than a general ability in the subject. It will demand an increased maturity and competence of candidates in practical and theoretical activities and in those relating to critical, historical and contextual aspects of the subject.
The course is intended to meet the needs of the following types of candidates:
a) those who will undertake further studies in Art and Design.
b) those who will study subjects or take up careers for which a background in Art and Design is relevant.
c) those who, while having an interest in and aptitude for the subject are not intending to undertake further studies in Art and Design.
Pupils receive 8 40 minute periods of Art per week.

Content

The AS is comprised of two components:
Component 1: Coursework, Personal Investigation. Worth 50% of the qualification. Students generate practical work, ideas and research from source. They develop ideas, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes and refine ideas and present outcomes, responding to the four Assessment Objectives.
Component 2: Externally Set Assignment, worth 50% of the qualification. Students respond to one externally set, broad-based themed starting point to encourage independence in developing ideas, intentions and response and refine ideas towards final outcome, responding to the four Assessment Objectives. Externally Personal outcome(s) in 10 hours of sustained focus. The period of sustained focus for the Externally Set Assignment at AS is 10 hours. The theme is released to teachers and students on 1 January each year.

Skills

The skills taught and assessed during the course are:

  • Development of ideas
  • Experiment, reviewing and refining
  • Recording from primary and secondary sources
  • Realisation of ideas and making connections with other artists

Homework

Students are expected to supplement their classwork with five hours of homework a week where they develop, explore and consolidate their work.

Assessment

Continual internal assessment, external moderation.

Resources and Materials

Individual Equipment:
All students need basic drawing and painting equipment for work at home. A high quality digital camera is today more or less an essential tool.
The Art Department possesses a well-stocked, continually updated library of books and videos which form an integral part of the course and are supplemented by the internet.


Biology

Introduction

Pupils follow topics 1 to 4 of Edexcel GCE (Salters Nuffield) in Biology in year 12. There are 8 periods of forty minutes per week of which two double lessons per week are usually devoted to practical work. Emphasis is placed on relevance of Biology to everyday life, and ethical issues in science. The impact of science on the fields of medicine and environment also feature prominently.

Content

  • Topic 1 - Lifestyle, Health and Risk
  • Topic 2 - Genes and Health
  • Topic 3 - The Voice of the Genome
  • Topic 4 - Biodiversity and Natural Resources
  • Topic 5 - Walk on the Wild Side (start this topic)

Skills

  • Knowledge and understanding
  • Practical biological and investigative skills
  • How Science works

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 4-5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports and ongoing revision and learning tasks.

Assessment

There will be an assessment after each topic, and an end of year 12 mock exam that assesses all 4 topics. The grades in these five exams will form a basis of the predicted grade for the UCAS form (university application) in year 13.

Resources and Materials

Edexcel A Level Science Series: AS Biology Students Book (Ann Fullick).


Chemistry

Introduction

The A-Level Chemistry syllabus places practical work in a central, all-encompassing role throughout the course. In this way, the essence of Chemistry, its use and significance in society are emphasised, and how it provides a vehicle for understanding, acquisition of vital skills and enjoyment. As part of the new A-Level course pupils now complete a series of Core Practicals (16 in total) which leads to the awarding of the practical endorsement qualification at the end of Year 13. In this way, A-Levels pupils around the world will enter university in the UK (or elsewhere) sure of possessing the basic skills required to succeed in a science based degree.
The inherent objective of recent changes to the syllabus has been to update the Chemistry taught in schools to incorporate more modern aspects of the subject, new techniques, and contemporary issues that affect our lives.

Content

A-Level - Year 12

  • Term 1:
    • Topic 1: Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
    • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure
    • Topic 3: Redox I
    • Topic 4: Inorganic Chemistry and the Periodic Table
    • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance
  • Term 2 / 3:
    • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure
    • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance
    • Topic 6: Organic Chemistry I
    • Topic 7: Modern Analytical Techniques I
    • Topic 8: Energetics I
    • Topic 9: Kinetics I
    • Topic 10: Equilibrium I

Skills

The following key skills are embedded in the curriculum:

  • Application of number
  • Communication
  • Information and Communication Technology
  • Improving learning and performance
  • Problem solving
  • Working with others

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports, online quizzes and learning tasks.

Assessment

Examinations:

  • There will be internal exams in the spring of Year 12 based on the material covered.
  • There are tests after each topic (5 or 6 per term) and a weekly series of online quizzes to ensure that pupils are making progress.

Resources and Materials

The following materials are provided:

  • Year 12 Text Book
  • Workbook
  • Revision guide
  • The Edexcel website: www.edexcel.org.uk
  • Excellent laboratory facilities with vanguard equipment and comprehensive resources

Drama & Theatre

Introduction

Drama and Theatre is a creative, analytical and evaluative A-level subject, which has both practical and theoretical components. Like all subjects, it a two-year linear A-level which has practical assessments in both Years 12 and 13, before a final three-hour written exam.

Content

In Year 12, students will focus on Component 2 of the Drama and Theatre A-level. This involves devising a piece of drama from a stimulus, working in groups to create an original and engaging short play. They must then write a 3,000 word piece of coursework exploring their creative process, and also linking their devised drama to a practitioner, usually the founder of theatrical naturalism: Konstantin Stanislavski. The devised piece will be filmed and internally marked, before being externally moderated by the AQA exam board.
Students will also study the Ancient Greek tragedy ‘Antigone’ by Sophocles, exploring it both practically and analytically, in preparation for the final Component 1 A-level exam at the end of Year 13.
Students will also watch live theatre productions throughout the year, before discussing and compiling notes on the actors’ performances, the directorial choices, and the design elements used, again as preparation for a section of the final exam.

Skills

Students will develop their practical drama skills, becoming more confident in their use of their voices and physicality. They will develop teamwork, script-writing and imaginative skills through devising. They will also be able to effectively describe, analyse and evaluate dramatic choices, whether from the perspective of a performer, director or designer.

Homework

Students will be given a range of homework tasks - writing essays and presentations, learning lines, annotating scripts, or reading play extracts.

Assessment

In Year 12, students’ devised pieces will be performed and filmed, and they will also complete and hand in their 3,000 explorative coursework related to their devised pieces.

Resources and Materials

Most final pieces will be performed either in the school or in a theatre hired specially for the purpose, so students have the opportunity to work in appropriate theatrical conditions.


Economics

Introduction

Economics is a social science that looks at how we share out scarce resources to satisfy human needs and wants. We place the consumer at the heart of the subject and consider how we might best use the factors of production to maximise welfare.
At Runnymede we offer the AQA economics course, which is a two year course leading to three exams at the end of year 13. Students are also expected to take the stand-alone AS exam at the end of year 12, giving them a separate qualification which offers a benchmark on their progress.

Content

There are two units in year 12, one focusing on microeconomics and one focusing on macroeconomics:
Microeconomics: here we look at the operation of markets and the challenges of market failure. We develop models of how a market works (demand and supply, the price mechanism, efficiency) and then explore how this applies to real life. Students are expected to be critical of the models we use and to understand how their limitations create challenges for policy makers when markets fail.
Macroeconomics: here we look at the operation of the economy and the challenge of achieving the objectives of growth, full employment, low inflation and a reasonable balance of payments. We develop models of the economy (circular flow, AD/AS analysis) and apply these to the current economic environment. Students are expected to have a good knowledge of the developments of the UK economy and government policies over the past 15 years.

Skills

Economics is a challenging subject which requires a good level of numeracy and literacy. Students are expected to have at least a B in Maths and B in English iGCSE, if they wish to join the course. In general the students who do best at economics are interested in the world around them and are happy to read around the subject.

Homework

Regular homework will be set. The normal routine is for students to do one short homework during the week and a longer homework over the weekend.

Assessment

There are two 90 minute exams, one for micro and one for macro. Each exam has two sections: section A consists of 20 multiple choice questions (20 marks) and section B consists of data response questions (50 marks).

Resources and Materials

Students are given a resource pack at the start of term which contains the basic resources which will be used to deliver the content of the course. Resources are then developed on an ongoing basis for each class as student progress is assessed. As such, each course is slightly different, depending upon student needs.


English

Introduction

Like several other subjects, the English Literature AS specification has changed this year. However, we are pleased that the Edexcel board continues to offer a wide range of interesting and challenging texts for our sixth-formers to study. Pupils are taught a total of 8 lessons by two different teachers.

Content

This year's Year 12 students will be preparing for an internal exam on the following texts:

  • "The Duchess of Malfi" by John Webster. This powerful Jacobean revenge tragedy is full of intense imagery, and features one of the great heroines in theatre.
  • "Poems of the Decade: An Anthology of the Forward Books of Poetry". Students will analyse a selection of poems from 2000-2010, offering them a stimulating opportunity to engage with contemporary poetry: works that speak of danger and wonder, fear and love.
  • Prose: 1 hour exam
  • "The Handmaid’s Tale" by Margaret Atwood and 'Never Let Me Go' by Kazuo Ishiguro. These two brilliant dystopian novels will be studied comparatively, with students encouraged to connect and contrast them in terms of language, structure, theme and context.

Skills

  • To encourage an enjoyment and appreciation of English Literature.
  • To develop a sense of style, period and form.
  • To demonstrate knowledge, insight and understanding in the interpretation of texts and of essay questions.
  • To demonstrate the ability to communicate responses clearly in a style appropriate to literary study.

Homework

In addition to classes on set books there are units of work on close reading and criticism. Essays are the main form of homework, though supplementary reading and other exercises are set from time to time. There is usually one essay per week for Year 12. Students of English Literature are expected to spend at least six hours per week on the subject outside class time. They are expected to take a thoughtful interest in the arts and other adjacent areas of study.

Assessment

Ongoing internal assessment is carried out during the year through essays and a Christmas examination. The student sits their main internal examination in the summer term.

Resources and Materials

The school library and the English Department book collection offer a wide range of background reading in all genres, from the medieval times to the present day.


French

Introduction

Languages are a key component of education at Runnymede College, with all students studying French up to IGCSE in Year 11 and a large number continuing in the Sixth Form. The study of French provides students with a lifelong skill in communicating in a widely spoken language of continued global importance, and the experience of doing so opens students up to a different culture and gives them the tools necessary to learn other languages in the future.
At A level the examination specifications demand that students use their language skills to respond to the world around them in a far more analytical way than previously. New structures and a more advanced vocabulary are required to support the more nuanced style of communication needed to express ideas clearly and subtly. Far greater use is made of authentic materials and students study history, literature and film to give them a broader sense of French culture and to give real context to their studies.
French is a popular subject at “A” level as the results at IGCSE (A* /A mainly) allow many students to opt for it. We are glad to see that it is becoming more and more common for our students to choose a university course with a language component. The school decided some time ago to offer an AS level and an A level in different blocks so most students can do it if they wish.

Content

  • Course structure - AQA Board - AS
    • Paper 1 Listening - Reading - Translation
    • Paper 2 Writing ( Literature & Translation)
    • Paper 3 Speaking
  • Topic areas
  • Current trends
  • Structures familiales
  • Cyber société
  • Rôle du bénévolat
  • Culture artistique francophone
  • Musique
  • Patrimoine
  • Cinéma

Skills

Skills to develop orally for paper 3.
Students need to develop language skills that allow them to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in spoken French. They must ensure that they apply their listening skills in this task to permit natural and logical interaction.

The assessment criteria reward students for:

  • response (initiative, development and abstract language)
  • quality of language (pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary, idiom, range of lexis, application of grammar and structures )
  • reading and research (knowledge of issue and other topics)
  • comprehension and development (understanding/ability to deal with questioning)

What students need to learn for paper 3.
Students are required to attain language skills that enable them to communicate effectively and confidently on a variety of topics and issues. Moreover, they will need to be able to supply facts, opinions and improvise language in an unrehearsed situation. They will also need to be able to respond appropriately to unpredictable questions and statements. They should be accustomed to responding to open questions, supplying considered and informed responses.

The assessment criteria reward students for:

  • quality of language
    • accuracy
    • range of lexis
  • response (development)
  • understanding (relevance, opinion)
    • stimulus-specific
    • general topic area
  • literature and the arts

Students would be expected to undertake in-depth study of a substantial French-language text, play or film. They would need to consider and demonstrate understanding of the following:

  • different characters
  • key themes/issues
  • social and cultural setting
  • styles/techniques employed.

Skills to develop for paper 1 and 2.a
Students should develop language skills that give them the ability to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in French language writing, to translate accurately from French into English, and to adequately understand spoken and written French. Students will be expected to show knowledge and understanding of and have the skills to deploy adequate grammar and structures.

Students will be assessed for the following:

  • Section A Listening
  • Section B Reading and transfer of meaning.
  • Section C written response to a stimulus exercise.
    • content and response
    • quality of language

Homework

Students listen to items of news on a regular basis. We think homework is of paramount importance in the learning process as it enables the students to work on their own and consolidate their knowledge and assess their progress. Students have homework practically every day. Regular testing takes place at the beginning of the lesson. Students are required to write essays and finish a unit of their text book. They often have to research a topic and prepare a presentation for the class.

Assessment

Year 12
Board: AQA

Terms

Sept- Oct

Theme 1: la famille
Theme 2: le patrimoine

1.1, 4.1
1.2, 4.2
1.3, 4.3 résumé et vocabulaire

Nov- Dec

Theme 1: Cyber-société
Theme 2: Musique francophone

2.1, 5.1
2.2, 5.2
2.3, 5.3 résumé et vocabulaire

Jan: MOCK

Jan- March

Theme 2: Cinéma
Film

6.1
6.2
6.3 résumé et vocabulaire

April- May

Stretching to A level requirement
Developing all skills up to A level standard
Study skills for independent research.
Dossier: cinéma et littérature

Theme 1: Bénévolat
3,1
3,2
3,3

Resources and Materials


Further Maths

Introduction

The new Further Mathematics A level (from 2017) now requires students to study elements from Pure Mathematics, Mechanics and Statistics. This enables pupils to have a much broader mathematical experience at A Level and helps provide a foundation for a wide range of higher education courses.

There are three overarching themes in the new Further Mathematics A Level:

  • Mathematical argument, language and proof
  • Mathematical problem solving
  • Mathematical modelling

These themes build on the skills developed in the IGCSE curriculum and are intended to develop a mathematician’s way of thinking.
A new element of the A level is the inclusion of a ‘large data set’ which supports the statistics element of the course. This requires much more understanding and analysis of data than previous syllabi and it is therefore important that we support the students with additional sessions to prepare them for this challenge.
Students who achieve a grade A or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study Mathematics AND Further Mathematics A levels (Two A level qualifications). They will complete the full Mathematics A level course in Year 12, then move onto the Further Mathematics A level modules in Year 13.
All external exams for both A level qualifications are taken at the end of Year 13.
They will have 16 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school ‘Large Data Set Sessions’. They will have 7 compulsory external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

Please refer to Curriculum Guide Y12 Mathematics in this document above.
The lesson schedule for Y12 Further Mathematics Students can be found on the website under VI Form, Further Maths https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_12_fm_2019-20_iln_sp.pdf

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 12 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.
A full breakdown of all the skills taught within the A Level syllabus can be found in the A Level Specification on the department website:
https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/a-level-l3-further-mathematics-specification.pdf

Homework

Homework is set after every double lesson and is expected to take around an hour. It will either be related to the content covered in class that day or week, or it will be a review task to give pupils the opportunity consolidate their understanding of a previously taught topic and enhance their memory of it in line with recent educational research. It may be a worksheet, textbook exercise or pack of exam style questions. Students will always be given optional extra challenge tasks so that they are able to challenge themselves appropriately. These homework tasks will rarely be marked by a teacher and students are expected to be responsible and independent in ensuring they seek help when necessary and make their corrections when marking it.
After every chapter students will be given a topic assessment to complete at home which will be marked by the teacher. This is designed to help students to consolidate their understanding and review the topic before moving on. Students are expected to use their notes to help them complete the work, therefore if they get less than 80% they are given extra support from their teacher outside of lessons in the form of a Maths Clinic.
We have high expectations of effort and expect every question on an assessment to be attempted in full. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on topic assessments completed at home.
In class students will also be assessed through formal tests each term. This will start with a baseline test at the beginning of the year to assess the summer work, and will then test the A Level material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research. Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan.
Assessment timings are outlined in the schedule link above.

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the Year 1 AND Year 2 Pure and Applied textbooks published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum, which are to be returned at the end of the course. They will also be provided with a revision workbook later in the year to help support their revision for the end of year examinations.
The use of a graphical calculator is required and students will be given the opportunity to purchase this from the school in September. It is then their responsibility to look after it, bring it to every lesson, and ensure it has functioning batteries.
Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website under VI Form, Further Maths, Year 12 Year 1 and Year 12 Year 2. In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Geography

Introduction

Geography is the study of the physical features of the earth's surface and the variety of human responses to the challenges and opportunities which these present.
The aims of the Geography A Level are for students:

  • to develop and apply their understanding of geographical concepts and processes.
  • to understand and interpret our changing world.
  • to develop their awareness of the complexity of interactions within and between societies, economies, cultures and environments at scales from local to global.
  • to develop as global citizens who recognise the challenges of sustainability and the implications for their own and others’ lives.
  • to improve as critical and reflective learners aware of the importance of attitudes and values, including their own.
  • to become adept in the use and application of skills and new technologies through their geographical studies both in and outside the classroom.
  • to be inspired by the world around them, and gain enjoyment and satisfaction from their geographical studies and understand their relevance.

Content

Area of Study 1: Dynamic Landscapes

  • Tectonic Processes and Hazards
  • Enquiry question 1: Why are some locations more at risk from tectonic hazards?
  • Enquiry question 2: Why do some tectonic hazards develop into disasters?
  • Enquiry question 3: How successful is the management of tectonic hazards and disasters?
  • Coastal Landscapes and Change
  • Enquiry question 1: Why are coastal landscapes different and what processes cause these differences?
  • Enquiry question 2: How do characteristic coastal landforms contribute to coastal landscapes?
  • Enquiry question 3: How do coastal erosion and sea-level change alter the physical characteristics of coastlines and increase risks?
  • Enquiry question 4: How can coastlines be managed to meet the needs of all players?

Area of Study 2: Dynamic Places

  • Globalisation
  • Enquiry question 1: What are the causes of globalisation and why has it accelerated in recent decades?
  • Enquiry question 2: What are the impacts of globalisation for countries, different groups of people and cultures and the physical environment?
  • Enquiry question 3: What are the consequences of globalisation for global development and the physical environment and how should different players respond to its challenges?
  • Diverse Places
  • Enquiry question 1: How do population structures vary?
  • Enquiry question 2: How do different people view diverse living spaces?
  • Enquiry question 3: Why are there demographic and cultural tensions in diverse places?
  • Enquiry question 4: How successfully are cultural and demographic issues managed?

Field work and research is a vital component of the A Level course and all students are expected to do a minimum of 4 days of field work as part of the course. Students will be taken on a residential field trip to help support their development of data collection techniques.

Skills

Summary of methods used in the course

  • Students will be learning and preparing for the final exams through research, reading, lectures, group work presentations, GIS, field work and plenty of exam practice.

Summary of skills developed in the course
The course requires students to:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of selected physical, human and environmental processes that underpin key geographical concepts
  • develop a knowledge and understanding of the key concepts of place, space, diversity, interdependence, people–environment interaction, the processes associated with these, and change over time
  • study at a range of scales and understand the importance of scale as a geographical idea
  • use a range of skills and techniques, including the use of maps and images at different scales necessary for geographical study
  • carry out research, and out-of-classroom work including fieldwork, as appropriate to the topics selected
  • use modern information technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS), as appropriate to the content
  • develop understanding of the application and relevance of geography.

Homework

Students will be set homework every lesson. Homework tasks range from note taking, revision, research, exam practice, essay questions to preparing for a presentation.

Assessment

The students have two internal exams in the summer term:

  • Paper 1: Dynamic Landscapes
    • The assessment consists of three sections.
    • The paper may include multiple-choice questions, short open, open response, calculations and resource-linked questions. The examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions.
    • Paper 2: Dynamic Places
      • The assessment consists of three sections
      • The paper may include multiple-choice questions, short open, open response, calculations and resource-linked questions. The examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions.

Throughout the course, students will also be assessed via homework, class work and end of topic tests.

Resources and Materials

Our school geography web-site: www.schoolgeography.com
Year 12 textbook


History

Introduction

History in the Sixth Form is, for the first time at Runnymede, an optional subject. In Year Twelve students study a syllabus which provides the first year of study for a full A Level qualification, for the Edexcel exam board.
We aim to provide a stimulating, challenging, enriching and rewarding programme that provides our students with a broad understanding of Twentieth Century history. They will learn to use all the skills of a historian, understanding that the subject has a methodology that is unique yet which will be applicable to a wide range of situations throughout life. Independent research, critical analysis and the ability to communicate in a fluent, persuasive and effective manner both orally and on paper. Students will also have to develop their ability to think conceptually, examining such ideas as causation, change, continuity, reliability and bias as well as historiography. Above all we hope to foster a lasting and deep love for the subject, one that will stimulate a lifelong engagement for our pupils.
Why study History at A Level
History is increasingly attracting students for a number of valid reasons. Above all, many pursue History because they love to engage with the past and find it stimulating and rewarding. We believe that this is the best reason for continuing with History at this level.
Some do so because it is considered by universities to be a very good academic subject, one that prepares students well in a range of cross curricular skills and that reflects true academic ability. The subject is highly regarded by admissions tutors. Some choose it because it forms part of a well balanced 'basket' of subjects that will allow the student to follow a particular course at University, perhaps English, Modern Languages or Economics. Others follow it because it can complement their 'basket' of subjects, showing breadth and variety in their abilities that will enhance their university application, say if they wish to pursue a career in medicine, engineering or business. As an A Level subject it works well as a contrast to Mathematics and the Sciences.

Content

  • Paper 1:
    • Russia, 1917–91: from Lenin to Yeltsin
    • Communist Government in the USSR, 1918-1985
    • Industrial and Agricultural Change, 1917-85
    • Control of the People, 1917-85
    • Social Developments, 1917-85
    • What explains the Fall of the USSR, 1985-1991
  • Paper 2:
    • Mao’s China, 1949-1976
    • Establishing Communist Rule, 1949-57
    • Agriculture and Industry, 1949-65
    • The Cultural Revolution and its Aftermath, 1966-76
    • Social and Cultural Changes, 1949-76
  • Paper 3:
    • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, 1780-1928
    • Reform of parliament, c1780-1928
    • Changing influences in parliament: the impact of parliamentary reform, c1780-1928

Skills

Skills for the A Level include research, analysis and explanation, both oral and written.
Students will research the period both in a directed and an independent manner, using their knowledge in class debate as well as their essays. Aside from their core texts we have a growing library which all students are encouraged to access. Analysis is developed throughout the year, with deepening argument being demanded, as well as the examination and evaluation of key themes, cause, consequence, change and continuity.
Essay skills are paramount for this syllabus and writing essays is a key component of the syllabus.
Students will also develop critical document skills.
Using primary and secondary sources, students will be introduced to the full range of historical skills, including analysis, evaluation, cross referencing of sources, reaching a judgement based on sources as well as evaluating judgements in the light of evidence.
Students must also communicate effectively in discussion and on paper.

Homework

Homework will be set every week and may well require students to work during the holidays as well. Full completion of all homework is vital for a student to make the progress needed for a good grade.
Reading will be a weekly, routine exercise as it lays the base of a student's knowledge.
Written exercises will vary, but regular essays will also be routine.
In addition, students will be asked to prepare a variety of short research pieces, seminar discussion papers and presentations.

Assessment

Assessment will be via an internal exam at the start of the third term in Year 12 which will be based on the final papers which students will take at the end of Year 13 which is of the following format.

  • Paper 1: Russia, 1917-1991: From Lenin to Yeltsin
    This examination lasts 2 hours 15 minutes and is marked out of 60.
    • Students answer three questions: one from Section A, one from Section B and one from Section C.
    • Section A comprises a choice of two essay questions that assess understanding of the period in breadth. Questions will normally cover periods of at least 10 years and target causation or consequence.
    • Section B comprises a choice of two essay questions that assess understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the Themes. Questions will normally cover periods equivalent to at least a third of the time span of the Themes. Causation, consequence, change, continuity, similarity, difference, significance could be included.
    • Section C comprises one compulsory question that assesses the ability to analyse and evaluate interpretations and target content specified in Historical interpretations for the relevant option.
    • Questions will be based on two extracts from historical interpretations totalling approximately 300 words.
  • Paper 2: Mao’s China from 1949-1976.
    The examination lasts 1 hour 30 minutes and is marked out of 40.
    • Students answer two questions: one from Section A and one from Section B.
    • Section A comprises a compulsory question for the option studied that assesses the ability to analyse and evaluate source material that is primary and/or contemporary to the period and target content specified in the Key topics for the relevant option.
    • Section B comprises a choice of three essay questions that assess understanding of the period in depth and target content specified in the key topics for the relevant option.

Resources and Materials

  • Russia:
    • Communist states in the 20th century, Steve Phillips et al. Pearson.
    • Communist states in the 20th century, Robin Bunce. Hodder.
    • Revolutionary Russia 1891-1991 A Pelican Introduction, Orlando Figes
    • Russia in Revolution 1881-1924, D Murphy
    • Stalin's Russia 1924-1953, R Bunce and L Gallagher
    • Communist Russia under Lenin and Stalin, Corin and Fiehn
    • Lenin and the Russian Revolution, S.Phillips
    • Stalinist Russia, S.Phillips
  • China:
    • Mao, M. Lynch
    • Access to History: Mao's China, M. Lynch
    • Modern China, E. Moise
    • The Penguin History of Modern China, J. Fenby
    • Articles from Modern History Review magazine
  • Additional Resources:
    • The department also has a large and growing library for the Sixth Form which students are encouraged to use.
    • We subscribe to two historical magazines and have a wide range of audio-visual resources.
  • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, 1780-1928
  • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, c1780-1928 by Peter Callaghan
  • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, c1780-1928 by Michael Scott-Baumann

Latin

Introduction

The purpose of the Latin Pre-U course (equivalent to A level) is to provide an understanding of some of the elements of Classical civilisation, literature and language which have had a great influence on our own, to increase experience by considering a wide range of issues. The course should be satisfying in itself and also provide a sound basis for further study.
It is also hoped in Runnymede that pupils' studies will increase their knowledge and understanding of their cultural heritage and of the world around them in Spain; that they will learn more of the language from which Spanish has evolved and English has borrowed enormously; and that they can analyse and develop the way they themselves use language and so use it more effectively.

Content

In Year 12, language knowledge needs to be consolidated and increased. Knowledge of accidence, syntax and vocabulary, although similar to that of IGCSE, needs to be developed. Covering this and preparing some of the set text work are the principal goals during this year. Some additional, non-examination work is done, on Roman history and some non-exam reading perhaps.
At the start of the year in grammar there is an emphasis on accidence, starting with nouns, adjectives and pronouns, before moving on to verbs. There should be considerable familiarity with this from IGCSE work, but a more precise knowledge is needed, and additional information (e.g. irregular forms, rare tenses) is introduced.
Syntax is increasingly more important as the year advances than accidence. Again much will have already been covered, but more detail is used (In both these areas, having small groups allows the possibility of flexibility and adapting the material to the needs, strengths and weaknesses of individual pupils. It is not possible or desirable to give at the start of a year a detailed plan of studies.)
Language work will be covered by the use of photocopies, rather than with any text book. Wilson's Latin Grammar and Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer are available as grammar reference books. The Chamber’s/Murray Latin-English Dictionary (ex-Smith's) is issued to all pupils. Unprepared translation and comprehension is practised with photocopies and Latin Unseens for A-level by Carter.
Some parts of the set texts, either some of Cicero's speech "in Verrem”, or some of the poetry, three of Ovid’s Heroides, are read mainly over the Spring and Summer Terms. (The major part of this literature work will be in done in Year 13.) Translation of these is obviously an important element but comprehension and some literary appreciation are important too. Written work will be done on some or all of the sections of any text read. Other literature may be read alongside set-books from Two Centuries of Roman Poetry and from other anthologies, particularly in the Summer term.

Skills

Pupils should be learning to:

  • Understand original Latin texts through translation and comprehension questions, through having a good knowledge of the vocabulary, endings and syntax of Latin, and understanding of the different ways that Latin and English (and Spanish) work as languages; understand and respond personally to the texts studied, both prose and poetry, through translation and questions on context, and on literary elements.

Homework

Homework will be given on many days on which there are lessons. It will not normally be given for the following day. Most will be learning of accidence or vocabulary, unprepared translation into Latin or English, or preparation of Latin texts or writing about them.

Assessment

The Year 12 course leads on to the Pre-U at the end of Year 13. This will involve unprepared translation from Latin into English and comprehension with grammar questions or an alternative option of translation from English into Latin. For the two literature papers the work done in Year 12 in 2019 and 2020 will involve translation, context and appreciation questions on some of the set texts (principally Cicero in Verrem V, and three of Ovid's Heroides). In Year 12 there will be formal language and literature assessment in April.

Resources and Materials

Apart from the necessary text books and grammar books, the department has a well-stocked library of works on historical, linguistic and literary themes, and in particular many Latin and Greek works in translation which pupils are encouraged to borrow. For example, those reading extracts from the Aeneid are recommended to read Homer’s Odyssey.
“SALVE”, the Runnymede Classics website, has information about the syllabus and help with the set books – if possible a copy of the text and copies of notes and questions given to pupils. It can be accessed by going to http://salve.runnymede-college.com.


Mathematics

Introduction

The new Maths A level (from 2017) now requires students to study elements from Pure Mathematics, Mechanics and Statistics. This enables pupils to have a much broader mathematical experience at A Level and helps provide a foundation for a wide range of higher education courses.
There are three overarching themes in the Edexcel Mathematics A Level Curriculum:

  • Mathematical argument, language and proof
  • Mathematical problem solving
  • Mathematical modelling

These themes build the on the skills developed in the IGCSE curriculum and are intended to develop a mathematician’s way of thinking.
A new element of the A level is the inclusion of a ‘large data set’ which supports the statistics element of the course. This requires much more understanding and analysis of data than previous syllabi and it is therefore important that we support the students with additional sessions to prepare them for this challenge.

The Mathematics department is unique in that it offers candidates two separate options in Mathematics, depending on the cohort option choices; the full A level qualification, or the AS qualification (half an A level).
Students who achieve a grade B or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study the full Mathematics A level. They will have 8 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school ‘Large Data Set Sessions’. They will have 3 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.
Students who achieve a grade C or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study towards the Mathematics AS level. They will have 4 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school ‘Large Data Set Sessions’. They will have 2 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

The linear style of the course means that material covered over the full two-year period will be tested on at the end of year 13. Students following the AS Mathematics course will only cover half of the following topics, and will cover the other half in Year 13. Students following the full A Level course will cover all of the topics below in Year 12.
Pure Mathematics Topics:
Algebraic Expressions, Quadratics, Equations and Inequalities, Graphs and Transformations, Straight line graphs, Circles, Algebraic Methods, Binomial Expansion, Trigonometry, Vectors, Differentiation, Integration and Exponentials and Logarithms.
Applied Mathematics Topics:
Statistics (Data Collection, Measures of Location and Speed, Representations of Data, Correlation, Probability, Statistical Distributions, Hypothesis Testing) and Mechanics (Modelling, Constant Acceleration, Forces and Motion, Variable Acceleration).
The full topic schedules for this year can be found on the department website, under VI Form, Regular Maths.
Regular Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_12_2019-20_nh.pdf

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 12 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.
A full breakdown of all the skills taught within the A Level syllabus can be found in the A Level Specification on the department website:
AS Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/as-l3-mathematics-specification.pdf
Regular Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/a-level-l3-mathematics-specification.pdf

Homework

Homework is set after every double lesson and is expected to take around an hour. It will either be related to the content covered in class that day or week, or it will be a review task to give pupils the opportunity consolidate their understanding of a previously taught topic and enhance their memory of it in line with recent educational research. It may be a worksheet, textbook exercise or pack of exam style questions. Students will always be given optional extra challenge tasks so that they are able to challenge themselves appropriately. These homework tasks will rarely be marked by a teacher and students are expected to be responsible and independent in ensuring they seek help when necessary and make their corrections when marking it.
After every chapter students will be given a topic assessment to complete at home which will be marked by the teacher. This is designed to help students to consolidate their understanding and review the topic before moving on. Students are expected to use their notes to help them complete the work, therefore if they get less than 70% they are given extra support from their teacher outside of lessons in the form of a Maths Clinic. We have high expectations of effort and expect every question on an assessment to be attempted in full. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on topic assessments completed at home.
In class students will also be assessed through formal tests each term. This will start with a baseline test at the beginning of the year to assess the summer work, and will then test the A Level material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research. Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan. Assessment timings are outlined in the schedule link above.

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the Year 1 Pure and Applied textbooks published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum, which are to be returned at the end of the course.
They will also be provided with a revision workbook later in the year to help support their revision for the end of year examinations.
The use of a graphical calculator is required and students will be given the opportunity to purchase this from the school in September. It is then their responsibility to look after it, bring it to every lesson, and ensure it has functioning batteries.
Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website under VI Form, AS Maths or Regular Maths.
In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Physics

Introduction

Physics A Level from AQA provides a seamless transition to A Level from previous studies at IGCSE and develops students’ interest and enthusiasm for physics. The Year 12 course provides different starting points so teachers can choose to start the course with familiar or new topics. This allows the Physics department to develop a course that is not only challenging but academically stimulating for the students.
Four weekly classes of 80 minutes duration are dedicated to the study of physics over the two-year cycle. Normally, one of the four will be devoted to acquiring experimental skills through practical work in the laboratory. A full range of experiments centred mainly on mechanics, heat, light, oscillations, electricity and magnetism is undertaken.

Content

The full A Level course consists of a core content and an option module that allows students to pursue and area of physics that may be of more interest to them or relevant to an area of study at university.
Specification can be found at:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/specifications/AQA-7407-7408-SP-2015.PDF

  • Core Topics:
    • Measurements and their errors
    • Particles and radiation
    • Waves
    • Mechanics and materials
    • Electricity
    • Further mechanics and thermal physics
    • Fields and their consequences
    • Nuclear physics
  • Options
    • Astrophysics
    • Medical physics
    • Engineering physics
    • Turning points in physics
    • Electronics

Skills

The new A Level Physics course is designed to fully test students abilities to design, carry out, and communicate experimental procedures to a very high standard. The practical endorsement, now required when applying through UCAS to UK Universities, improves students investigative skills to a standard used by university departments around the world. The main skill foci are listed below.

1. To support and consolidate scientific concepts (knowledge and understanding). This is done by applying and developing what is known and understood of abstract ideas and models. Through practical work we are able to make sense of new information and observations, and provide insights into the development of scientific thinking.
2. To develop investigative skills. These transferable skills include:

  • Devising and investigating testable questions
  • Identifying and controlling variables
  • Analysing, interpreting and evaluating data.
  • To build and master practical skills such as:
  • Using specialist equipment to take measurements
  • Handling and manipulating equipment with confidence and fluency
  • Recognising hazards and planning how to minimise risk.

Homework

Homework will comprise of exam style questions once per week, which focuses on the core content in the syllabus and at least one online homework set through ISAAC PHYSICS, which provides opportunities for extension. In addition to these common homework tasks pupils will have the opportunity to study for the Oxford challenges, however, this does require additional study at home.

Assessment

Students will be assessed at the end of every topic, and before each reporting cycle. Students will also receive and end of year full Internal exam which counts towards their predicted grades for university. In year 12 the students will be assessed on the following topics:

  • Measurements and their errors
  • Particles and radiation
  • Waves
  • Mechanics and materials
  • Electricity

Resources and Materials

Theory classes are supported by excellent textbooks – endorsed by AQA – that are seldom used in class but form the basis for home study and revision exercises:
"Advanced Physics For You" by Keith Johnson Published by Oxford university press
www.isaacphysics.com
The pupils are also provided with a further range of texts that go further and deeper than syllabus requirements.
Practical work is carried out in a purpose-built physics laboratory with a full range of apparatus including multimeters, signal generators and cathode ray oscilloscopes. The laboratory is equipped with an interactive white board that greatly facilitates the viewing of experimental simulations. The pupils are encouraged to do their own independent research and build a bank of internet addresses for future reference.


Spanish

Introduction

  • The Spanish department at Runnymede College aims to encourage their students to:
    • Develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning.
    • Develop understanding of the language in a variety of contexts and genres.
    • Communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in Spanish for a range of purposes.
    • Develop awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken.
    • Consider their study of the language in a broader context.
  • The Year 12 Spanish course enables students to:
    • Derive enjoyment and benefit from language learning.
    • Acquire knowledge, skills and understanding for practical use, further study and/or employment.
    • Enjoy reading a variety of literary texts.
    • Communicate with speakers of the language.
    • Take their place in a multilingual global society.
    • Succeed in the A Level examinations.

Content

Based on textbooks AQA Spanish AS and A Level, Oxford and Hodder Education

  • Term 1
    • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
      Artistic culture in the Hispanic world
      Students must study the sub-theme Spanish regional identity in relation to Spain. Students may study the remaining sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
      Spanish regional identity (La identidad regional en España)
      • Tradiciones y costumbres
      • La gastronomía
      • Las lenguas
      Cultural heritage (El patrimonio cultural)
      • Sitios turísticos y civilizaciones prehispánicas: Machu Picchu, la Alhambra, etc
      • Arte y arquitectura
      • El patrimonio musical y su diversidad
    • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
    • C. Literature
      • Text: Las bicicletas son para el verano, by Fernando Fernán Gómez
      • Film: Tierra y Libertad, Ken Loach
    • D. Grammar and vocabulary:
      Main grammar book:
      Spanish verb tenses
      These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
      Grammar revision, main points:
      • Preterite/imperfect
      • Future
      • Conditional
      • Perfect tense
      • Future perfect
      • Conditional perfect
      • Pluperfect
      • Passive voice
      • Continuous tenses
      • Subjunctive mood
    • E. Essay writing and translations.
      Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week. Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
  • Term 2
    • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
      Multiculturalism in Hispanic society (A Level topics)
      Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
      La inmigración
      • Los beneficios y los aspectos negativos
      • La inmigración en el mundo hispánico
      • Los indocumentados-problemas
    • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
    • C. Literature
      • Text: Revision of Las bicicletas son para el verano, by Fernando Fernán Gómez
      • Project: Analysis of the Spanish Civil War and the Spanish Second Republic
      • Film: El laberinto del Fauno , Guillermo del Toro
    • D. Grammar and vocabulary
      These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
    • E. Essay writing and translations
      Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week.
      Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
      Grammar revision, main points:
      • Imperative
      • Present subjunctive
      • Perfect subjunctive
      • Imperfect subjunctive
      • Pluperfect subjunctive
      • Uses of the subjunctive
  • Term 3
    • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
      Multiculturalism in Hispanic society (A Level topics)
      Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
      El racismo
      • Las actitudes racistas y xenófobas
      • Las medidas contra el racismo
      • La legislación anti-racista
    • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
    • C. Literature
      Film: Ocho apellidos vascos, by Emilio Martínez- Lázaro
      Resources: https://zigzageducation.co.uk/support/languages/5805
    • D. Grammar and vocabulary:
      These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
    • E. Essay writing and translations.
      • Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week.
      • Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.

Skills

  • LISTENING: Show a clear understanding of the spoken language including regional varieties and different registers and demonstrate an ability to infer meaning.
  • READING: Show a clear understanding of a range of written texts, including newspaper articles and literary texts and demonstrate an ability to infer meaning.
  • SPEAKING: Develop ideas and express and justify points of view effectively, respond readily and fluently and take the initiative, be able to deal appropriately with unpredictable elements.
  • WRITING: Show the ability to organise and structure a range of texts coherently, offer relevant information which addresses the requirements of the task, make effective use of a wide range of vocabulary and a variety of complex structures, use grammar, morphology and syntax in an accurate way.

Homework

  • Learning vocabulary and verb tenses.
  • Reading comprehension texts.
  • Writing argumentative, narrative, descriptive and creative essays.
  • Reading literature.
  • Working through activities from the textbook.a
  • Working through past papers.
  • Preparing oral presentations.
  • Researching for information.
  • Watching the news and series.
  • Reading newspapers and magazines in Spanish.
  • Practising their language skills outside school.

Assessment

Being a language, assessment takes place in the classroom naturally on a daily basis. Moreover, formal written work is set and marked by the teacher at least once a week. Vocabulary and verbs are assessed at least every other week. Assessment is a very important part of this subject as it is essential that the teacher diagnoses the pupils' weaknesses and focuses on them in order for pupils to overcome them.

EXAM DESCRIPTION:
The A level exam consists of three papers:

  • Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing.academic
    Duration: 2 hours 30 minutes; total raw mark: 100
  • 2. Paper 2: Writing
    Duration: 2 hours; total raw mark: 80
  • 3. Paper 3: Speaking
    Duration: 21-23 minutes (including 5 minutes supervised preparation time); total raw mark: 60
    Note: these pupils will not sit the AS exam at the end of Year 12 but the A Level examination at the end of Year 13.

Resources and Materials

  • AQA Spanish AS and Year 1 A Level, Oxford
  • AQA Spanish A level (includes AS), Hodder Education
  • Acción Gramática, Hodder Murray
  • Test yourself- Spanish Grammar, McGraw Hill
  • Practice Makes Perfect, Complete Spanish Grammar, McGraw Hill
  • Spanish verb tenses, Practice makes Perfect, MCGraw Hill
  • Gramática básica del estudiante de español, Editorial Difusión
  • La Casa de Bernarda Alba, Federico García Lorca
  • Regular reading of Spanish-speaking newspapers and magazines is required. These are a few suggestions:
  • El Mundo, El País, ABC, La Razón, Telva, Viajar, Traveler, Expansión, Tiempo,
  • Fotogramas, Car and Driver, Nuevo Estilo, Casa 10, Leer, etc.
  • Regular viewing of the following programmes is also required:
  • Telediario
  • Informe Semanal
  • La 2 noticias
  • Ciudades para el siglo XXI
  • Documentos TV
  • Repor
  • Para todos la 2
  • Un país para comérselo
  • Españoles por el mundo (all of the above can be found in www.rtve.es)