Curriculum Guides Year 13

Art

Introduction

The AS and A Levels are now linear qualifications, so that all student work will be submitted and assessed at the end of the course.
AS Art & Design is a completely stand-alone course. This means that if a student does the AS and then decides to go on to do the A Level, the mark achieved at AS will not count towards their A Level mark and grade.
The courses offer more flexibility to students. Students can choose only AS in year 12. If they then decide to do the full A Level, they can do the A Level in one year. The full A Level is now a 2 year course.
A Level incorporates and builds on the aims of GCSE Art and Design but requires something more than a general ability in the subject. It will demand an increased maturity and competence of candidates in practical and theoretical activities and in those relating to critical, historical and contextual aspects of the subject.
The course is intended to meet the needs of the following types of candidates:
a) those who will undertake further studies in Art and Design;
b) those who will study subjects or take up careers for which a background in Art and Design is relevant;
c) those who, while having an interest in and aptitude for the subject are not intending to undertake further studies in Art and Design.
Pupils receive 8 40 minute periods of Art per week.

Content

Edexcel Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Art and Design
Unit 1: Coursework: 60%
Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment: 40%
The course aims to develop the education of the imagination, feeling and sensibility and to provide an opportunity for exploration and understanding of materials whilst developing skills and processes. The course is structured to allow individual freedom to develop ideas, carry out visual research, analyse artistic problems that have confronted other artists and to recognise art as a problem-solving activity - a form of thinking.
Pupils receive 8 periods of Art per week.
COMPONENT 1: Personal Investigation (Coursework) which is 60% of the qualification.The Personal Investigation comprises of practical work from personal starting points. Students are expected to generate practical work, ideas and research from sources, explore media and processes, develop and refine ideas and present outcomes responding to the four assessment objectives.
Students also submit a Written Personal Study - a piece of continuous prose, minimum 1000 - 3000 words that relates to their coursework theme.
COMPONENT 2: Externally Set Assignment, which is 40% of the qualification.The theme is released to teachers and students on the 1st February each year.
Students submit preparatory studies and personal outcome(s) in 15 hours of sustained focus.

Skills

The skills taught and assessed during the course are:

  • Development of ideas
  • Experiment, reviewing and refining
  • Recording from primary and secondary sources
  • Realisation of ideas and making connections with other artists

Homework

Students are expected to supplement their classwork with five hours of homework a week where they develop, explore and consolidate their work.

Assessment

Continual internal assessment, external moderation.

Resources and Materials

Individual Equipment:
All students need basic drawing and painting equipment for work at home. A high quality digital camera is today more or less an essential tool.
The Art Department possesses a well-stocked, continually updated library of books and videos which form an integral part of the course and are supplemented by the internet.


Biology

Introduction

Pupils are prepared for the Edexcel Advanced (A2) GCE in Biology (syllabus code 9B101) in Year 13. There are eight periods of forty minutes per week of which two double lessons per week are usually devoted to practical work. The A-Level qualification is the second part of the two year A Level course and is the highest level qualification in school for those intending to pursue a biological or medical degree, or any other degree where scientific/biological content are relevant.

Content

  • Topic 5 - On the Wild Side
  • Topic 6 - Infection, Immunity and Forensics
  • Topic 7 - Run For Your Life
  • Topic 8 . Grey Matter

Skills

  • Knowledge and understanding
  • Practical biological and investigative skills
  • How Science works

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 4-5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports and learning tasks.

Assessment

There will be three exam papers at the end of year 13.
Paper 1 covers topics 1, 2, 3 , 4, 5 and 6
Paper 2 cover topics 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 8
Paper 3 covers all A level topics and will feature questions on a pre-release article

Resources and Materials

Edexcel A Level Science Series: AS Biology Students Book (A Fullick).


Chemistry

Introduction

The A-Level Chemistry syllabus places practical work in a central, all-encompassing role throughout the course. In this way, the essence of Chemistry, its use and significance in society are emphasised, and how it provides a vehicle for understanding, acquisition of vital skills and enjoyment. As part of the new A-Level course pupils now complete a series of Core Practicals (16 in total) which leads to the awarding of the practical endorsement qualification at the end of Year 13. In this way, A-Levels pupils around the world will enter university in the UK (or elsewhere) sure of possessing the basic skills required to succeed in a science based degree.
The inherent objective of recent changes to the syllabus has been to update the Chemistry taught in schools to incorporate more modern aspects of the subject, new techniques, and contemporary issues that affect our lives.

Content

A-Level - Year 12

  • Term 1:
    • Further Equilibrium
    • Acid base Equilibria
    • Further Energetics
    • Further Redox
  • Term 2 / 3:
    • Transition Metals
    • Further Kinetics
    • Further Organic Chemistry

Skills

The following key skills are embedded in the curriculum:

  • Application of number
  • Communication
  • Information and Communication Technology
  • Improving learning and performance
  • Problem solving
  • Working with others

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports and learning tasks.

Assessment

Internal Examinations:

  • There will be external exams in the spring of Year 13, the so-called “Mock” exams. These will be based on the material covered in the whole course.
  • There are tests after each topic, about 5 or 6 per term, and a weekly series of online quizzes to ensure that pupils are making progress.

External Examinations (taken at the end of Year 13):

  • Students are expected to carry out the sixteen core practical experiments that are identified in the topics.
  • Students must complete all assessment in May/June in any single year.

Paper 1, Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification):

  • Assessment is 1 hour 45 minutes.
  • The paper consists of 90 marks.
  • The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions.

Paper 2, Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification):

  • Assessment is 1 hour 45 minutes.
  • The paper consists of 90 marks.
  • The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions.

Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry
Overview of content:

  • Questions in this paper may draw on any of the topics in this specification.
  • The paper will include synoptic questions that may draw on two or more 
different topics listed.
  • The paper will include questions that assess conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods (indirect practical skills) that will draw on students’ experiences of the core practicals. Overview of assessment
  • Assessment is 2 hours 30 minutes.
  • The paper consists of 120 marks.
  • The paper may include short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions.

Resources and Materials

The following materials are provided:

  • Year 13 Text Book
  • Workbook
  • Revision guide
  • The Edexcel website: www.edexcel.org.uk
  • Excellent laboratory facilities with vanguard equipment and comprehensive resources

Drama & Theatre

Introduction

Drama and Theatre is a creative, analytical and evaluative A-level subject, which has both practical and theoretical components. Like all subjects, it a two-year linear A-level which has practical assessments in both Years 12 and 13, before a final three-hour written exam.

Content

In Year 13, students will work towards the completion of Component 3. This involves the practical exploration of three extracts from a variety of significant plays, including ‘Miss Julie’ by August Strindberg and ‘The Crucible’ by Arthur Miller. They will finally perform an extract from a third play in front of an external examiner, while also writing a 3,000 word piece of coursework describing and analysing their process.
Students will also study ‘The Glass Menagerie’ by Tennessee Williams, evaluating how they would perform, direct and design this classic of American drama.
Students will also continue to watch live theatre productions throughout the year, before discussing and compiling notes on the actors’ performances, the directorial choices, and the design elements used, again as preparation for a section of the final exam.

Skills

Students will further develop their practical drama skills, becoming more confident in their use of their voices and physicality, and in their knowledge of the dramatic repertoire and the work of essential practitioner. They will also be able to more effectively describe, analyse and evaluate dramatic choices, whether from the perspective of a performer, director or designer.

Homework

Students will be given a range of homework tasks - writing essays and presentations, learning lines, annotating scripts, or reading play extracts.

Assessment

Students will perform their third extract before an external examiner, and also complete a 3,000 word coursework on their work on all three extracts. They will prepare for and revise for the final three-hour written exam on ‘Antigone’, ‘The Glass Menagerie’ and a live production they have seen.

Resources and Materials

The final Component 3 pieces will be performed either in the school or in a theatre hired specially for the purpose, so students have the opportunity to work in appropriate theatrical conditions.


Economics

Introduction

Economics is a social science that looks at how we share out scarce resources to satisfy human needs and wants. We place the consumer at the heart of the subject and consider how we might best use the factors of production to maximise welfare.
At Runnymede we offer the AQA economics course, which is a two year course leading to three exams at the end of year 13. Students are also expected to take the stand-alone AS exam at the end of year 12, giving them a separate qualification which offers a benchmark on their progress. Those that are successful will continue on to the second year of the course.

Content

In the second year of the A-level we revisit micro and macro economics but take a much more in-depth and critical look at the models used to analyse economic activity.
Micro: we develop our understanding of consumer markets and move on from traditional economic modelling to consider the influence of behavioural economics on current thinking. We also look in more depth at perfect markets and contrast them with oligopoly and monopoly. We analyse the labour market and consider the issues of inequality and poverty.
Macro: we develop the AD/AS model to look at current economic performance in a global context. We also take a careful look at financial markets and recent moves to regulate activities following the global credit crunch. Finally, we consider the costs and benefits of globalisation.

Skills

Economics is a challenging subject which requires a good level of numeracy and literacy. Students are expected to have at least a B in Maths and B in English iGCSE, if they wish to join the course. To continue on to year 13 we expect students to have passed the first year of the course and achieved at least a C at AS.
In general the students who do best at economics are interested in the world around them and are happy to read around the subject.

Homework

Regular homework will be set. The normal routine is for students to do one short homework during the week and a longer homework over the weekend.

Assessment

There are three final papers, each of which lasts two hours:

  • Paper One (markets and market failure): this paper has two sections, a data response worth 40 marks and and essay section worth 40 marks.
  • Paper Two (national and international economy): this paper has two sections, a data response worth 40 marks and an essay section worth 40 marks.
  • Paper Three (economic principles and issues): this paper has two sections, 30 multiple choice questions worth 30 marks and a case study worth 50 marks.

Resources and Materials

Students are given a resource pack at the start of term which contains the basic resources which will be used to deliver the content of the course. Resources are then developed on an ongoing basis for each class as student progress is assessed. As such, each course is slightly different, depending upon student needs.


English

Introduction

In Year 13, students complete a piece of coursework (20% of the A-level), and also study two more texts, while also revising and developing the skills required for success in their final summer exams.
Pupils are taught a total of 8 lessons by three different teachers.

Content

Students will study two more exam texts:

  • "Othello" by William Shakespeare. This intense tragedy allows students to explore ideas about race and gender in early modern England and Europe, while also analyses some of Shakespeare's greatest characterisation and language.
  • Romantic poetry. Students analyse an anthology of poems representative of the Romantic movement, from Wordsworth and Blake to Keats and Byron, while also discovering about the ideological, political and socio-economic contexts of late eighteenth and early nineneeth-century Britain.

Coursework: one 3,000 word critical, comparative essay on twentieth-century drama:

  • "Betrayal" by Harold Pinter and "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" by Edward Albee will be the two texts studied for the coursework. Students will be given a selection of questions to choose from, allowing them to demonstrate their engagement with the complexities and contexts of such seemingly contrasting plays. Critical material will also be studied, and students will produce an academically rigorous essay which covers all the exam board’s assessment objectives.

Skills

  • To encourage an enjoyment and appreciation of English Literature.
  • To develop a sense of style, period and form.
  • To demonstrate knowledge, insight and understanding in the interpretation of texts and of essay questions.
  • To demonstrate the ability to communicate responses clearly in a style appropriate to literary study.

Homework

In addition to classes on set books there are units of work on close reading and criticism. Essays are the main form of homework, though supplementary reading and other exercises are set from time to time. In Year 13 students are expected to write extended essays under examination conditions. Students of English Literature are expected to spend at least six hours per week on the subject outside class time. They are expected to take a thoughtful interest in the arts and other adjacent areas of study.

Assessment

Ongoing internal assessment is carried out during the year through essays and a Christmas examination. The student sits their external examination in the summer term. Coursework is completed in the Spring term.

Resources and Materials

The school library and the English Department book collection offer a wide range of background reading in all genres, from the medieval times to the present day.


French

Introduction

Languages are a key component of education at Runnymede College, with all students studying French up to IGCSE in Year 11 and a large number continuing in the Sixth Form. The study of French provides students with a lifelong skill in communicating in a widely spoken language of continued global importance, and the experience of doing so opens students up to a different culture and gives them the tools necessary to learn other languages in the future.
At A level the examination specifications demand that students use their language skills to respond to the world around them in a far more analytical way than previously. New structures and a more advanced vocabulary are required to support the more nuanced style of communication needed to express ideas clearly and subtly. Far greater use is made of authentic materials and students study history, literature and film to give them a broader sense of French culture and to give real context to their studies.
French is a popular subject at “A” level as the results at IGCSE (A* /A mainly) allow many students to opt for it. We are glad to see that it is becoming more and more common for our students to choose a university course with a language component. The school decided some time ago to offer an A level in different blocks so most students can do it if they wish.

Content

  • Course structure - AQA Board - AS
    • Paper 1 Listening - Reading - Translation
    • Paper 2 Writing ( Literature & Translation)
    • Paper 3 Speaking
  • Term 1:
    • Theme 7: Société diverse
    • Theme 10: Engagement politique
    • Theme 8: Les marginalisés
    • Theme 11: Manifestations et grèves
    • Paper 3: Oral presentation -independent research
  • Term 2:
    • Theme 9: Criminalité
    • Theme 12: Immigration
    • Literature analysis:Maupassant Les Contes de la Guerre
  • Term 3:
    • Revision Year 12 themes
    • Revision Year 12 Film analysis: Aurevoir les Enfants
    • Revision Paper 3 Oral

Skills

Students need to develop language skills that allow them to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in spoken French. They must ensure that they apply their listening skills in this task to permit natural and logical interaction.
Students learn to demonstrate skills in advanced level French writing and acquire the ability to translate from English into French and also from French to English. Students will learn to demonstrate their ability to understand texts, films and literature. The topic areas in the programme are linked to the culture and society of French-speaking countries

Homework

We think homework is of paramount importance in the learning process as it enables the students to work on their own and consolidate their knowledge and assess their progress. Regular testing takes place at the beginning of the lesson. Students are required to write essays and finish a unit of their text book. They often have to research a topic and prepare a presentation for the class.

Assessment

Septembre
Résumé & Vocab
DPT EXAM

Octobre
Reports

Novembre
Résumé & Vocab

Décembre
DPT Oral Exam

Février
Reports
Résumé & Vocab

Mars
DPT Oral Exam

Avril
RC EXAM week

Mai
Report-grade
Orals paper 3

Juin
Paper 1 & 2
A Level
Paper 3
Task 1: Students choose a card and discussion will last for 5 minutes.
Task 2:Students will be expected to give an overview of their chosen issue for about two minutes , in which they put forward an opinion on an issue set in a French speaking country. They should then defend and justify their opinions for up to nine minutes. The teacher/examiner will engage the student on a spontaneous discussion.
Paper 3 therefore assesses a definite knowledge of French speaking countries as well as speaking skills. Students need to develop language skills that allow them to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in spoken French.
Total exam time: 23 minutes.
Paper 2:
This unit requires students to demonstrate skills in advanced-level French writing and adequate ability in translation from English into French.
This unit will test their ability to analyse a film and a literary text.
Total exam time: 2h
Paper 1:
Listening, Reading, translation will be taken from the themes studied in Year 12 and 13.
Total exam time:2h30

Resources and Materials

  • Book: AQA AS/AL and various grammar books
  • Internet: TF1, Franceinfo
  • Sites: our French site: relevantideas.weebly.com where students can find articles and listening items of news on all the topics for Year 12 and 13

Further Maths

Introduction

The new Further Mathematics A level (from 2017) now requires students to study elements from Pure Mathematics, Mechanics and Statistics. This enables pupils to have a much broader mathematical experience at A Level and helps provide a foundation for a wide range of higher education courses.

There are three overarching themes in the new Further Mathematics A Level:

  • Mathematical argument, language and proof
  • Mathematical problem solving
  • Mathematical modelling

These themes build on the skills developed in the IGCSE curriculum and are intended to develop a mathematician’s way of thinking.
A new element of the A level is the inclusion of a ‘large data set’ which supports the statistics element of the course. This requires much more understanding and analysis of data than previous syllabi and it is therefore important that we support the students with additional sessions to prepare them for this challenge.
Students who achieve a grade A or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study Mathematics AND Further Mathematics A levels (Two A level qualifications). They will complete the full Mathematics A level course in Year 12, then move onto the Further Mathematics A level modules in Year 13.
All external exams for both A level qualifications are taken at the end of Year 13.
They will have 16 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school "Large Data Set Sessions". They will have 7 compulsory external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

Students will study four modules in Year 13 that will make up the Further Mathematics A level; two Pure and two Applied, each with an examination that will count for 25% of the A level.

Core Pure 1
Complex Numbers, Argand Diagrams, Series, Roots of Polynomials, Volumes of Revolution, Matrices, Linear Transformations, Proof by Induction, Vectors.

Core Pure 2
Complex Numbers, Series, Methods in Calculus, Volumes of Revolution, Polar Coordinates, Hyperbolic Functions, Methods in Differential Equations, Modelling with Differential Equations.

Further Statistics 1
Discrete Random Variables, Poisson Distributions, Geometric and Negative Binomial Distributions, Hypothesis Testing, Central Limit Theorem, Chi-Squared Test, Probability Generating Functions, Quality of Tests.

Further Mechanics 1
Momentum and Impulse, Work, Energy and Power, Elastic Strings and Springs, Elastic Collisions in One Dimension, Elastic Collisions in Two Dimensions.

The full topic schedules for this year can be found on the department website, under VI Form, Further Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_13_fm_2019-20_dy___la_final.pdf

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 13 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.
A full breakdown of all the skills taught within the A Level syllabus can be found in the A Level Specification on the department website:
https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/a-level-l3-further-mathematics-specification.pdf

Homework

Homework is set after every double lesson and is expected to take around an hour. It will either be related to the content covered in class that day or week, or it will be a review task to give pupils the opportunity consolidate their understanding of a previously taught topic and enhance their memory of it in line with recent educational research. It may be a worksheet, textbook exercise or pack of exam style questions. Students will always be given optional extra challenge tasks so that they are able to challenge themselves appropriately. These homework tasks will rarely be marked by a teacher and students are expected to be responsible and independent in ensuring they seek help when necessary and make their corrections when marking it.
After every chapter students will be given a topic assessment to complete at home which will be marked by the teacher. This is designed to help students to consolidate their understanding and review the topic before moving on. Students are expected to use their notes to help them complete the work, therefore if they get less than 80% they are given extra support from their teacher outside of lessons in the form of a Maths Clinic.
We have high expectations of effort and expect every question on an assessment to be attempted in full. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on topic assessments completed at home.
In class students will also be assessed through formal tests each term. This will start with a baseline test at the beginning of the year to assess the summer work, and will then test the A Level material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research.
Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan.
Assessment timings are outlined in the schedule link above.
The external summative exams take place in June. There are 7 in total:
Mathematics: Pure 1, Pure 2, Applied
Further Mathematics: Core Pure 1, Core Pure 2, Further Statistics 1, Further Mechanics 1

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the CP1, CP2, FS1 and FM1 textbooks published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum, which are to be returned at the end of the course.
The use of a graphical calculator will continue to be required.
Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website under under VI Form, Further Maths, Year 13 Core Pure 1 & 2 and Year 13 Further Applied.
In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Geography

Introduction

Geography is the study of the physical features of the earth's surface and the variety of human responses to the challenges and opportunities which these present.
The aims of the Geography A Level are for students:

  • to develop and apply their understanding of geographical concepts and processes.
  • to understand and interpret our changing world.
  • to develop their awareness of the complexity of interactions within and between societies, economies, cultures and environments at scales from local to global.
  • to develop as global citizens who recognise the challenges of sustainability and the implications for their own and others’ lives.
  • to improve as critical and reflective learners aware of the importance of attitudes and values, including their own.
  • to become adept in the use and application of skills and new technologies through their geographical studies both in and outside the classroom.
  • to be inspired by the world around them, and gain enjoyment and satisfaction from their geographical studies and understand their relevance.

Content

In the second year of the course, students will study the following topics:

  • The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity:
    • Enquiry question 1: What are the processes operating within the hydrological cycle from global to local scale?
    • Enquiry question 2: What factors influence the hydrological system over short and long-term timescales?
    • Enquiry question 3: How does water insecurity occur and why is it becoming such a global issue for the 21st century?
  • Superpowers:
    • Enquiry question 1: What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?
    • Enquiry question 2: What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and physical environment?
    • Enquiry question 3: What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?
  • The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security:
    • Enquiry question 1: How does the carbon cycle operate to maintain planetary health?
    • Enquiry question 2: What are the consequences for people and the environment of our increasing demand for energy
    • Enquiry question 3: How are carbon and water cycles linked to the global climate system?
  • Health, Human Rights and Intervention:
    • Enquiry question 1: What is human development and why do levels vary from place to place?
    • Enquiry question 2: Why do human rights vary from place to place?
    • Enquiry question 3: How are human rights used as arguments for political and military intervention?
    • Enquiry question 4: What are the outcomes of geopolitical interventions in terms of human development and human rights?

Independent investigation:

  • During the A Level course, students will also investigate a Geographical topic of their choice. They will collect primary and secondary data and analyse it to draw conclusions. This will be written up in the form of a report of 3000-4000 words.
  • The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated

Field work and research is a vital component of the A Level course and all students are expected to do a minimum of 4 days of field work. Students will be taken on a residential field trip to help support their development of data collection techniques.

Skills

Summary of methods used in the course:

  • Students will be learning and preparing for the final exams through research, reading, group work presentations, GIS, field work and plenty of exam practice.

Summary of skills developed in the course:
In addition to the skills developed in the AS course, the A2 course requires students to:

  • undertake individual research/investigative work, including fieldwork
  • extend their understanding of geographical ideas, concepts and processes
  • identify and analyse the connections between the different aspects of geography
  • analyse and synthesise geographical information in a variety of forms and from a range of sources
  • consider new ideas and developments about the changing nature of geography in the 21st century
  • critically reflect on and evaluate the potential and limitations of approaches and methods used both in and outside the classroom.

Homework

Students will be set homework every lesson. Homework tasks range from revision, research, exam practice, essay questions to preparing for a presentation.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on the content from both Year 1 and Year 2 of the course.

  • Paper 1 (2 hours 15 minutes, 30% of the qualification):
    • Section A: Topic 1- Tectonic Processes and Hazards.
    • Section B: Topic 2B - Coastal Landscapes and Change.
    • Section C: Topic 5- The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity and Topic 6: The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security.
    • Paper 2 (2 hours 15 minutes, 30% of the qualification):
      • Section A: Topics 3 and 7- Globalisation/Superpowers.
      • Section B: Topic 4B - Diverse Places.
      • Section C: Topic 8A- Health, Human Rights and Intervention
    • Paper 3 (2 hours 15 minutes, 20% of the qualification):
      A synoptic paper based on the themes of:
      • Players
      • Attitudes and actions
      • Futures and uncertainties
    • Independent Investigation (20% of the qualification):
      • The student will produce a report of 3000-4000 words
      • The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated

Resources and Materials

Our school geography web-site: www.schoolgeography.com
Year 12 textbook


History

Introduction

History in the Sixth Form is, for the first time at Runnymede, an optional subject. In Year 13 students study the second year of a syllabus which leads to an A Level qualification, for the Edexcel exam board.
We aim to provide a stimulating, challenging, enriching and rewarding programme that provides our students with a broad understanding of Twentieth Century history. They will learn to use all the skills of a historian, understanding that the subject has a methodology that is unique yet which will be applicable to a wide range of situations throughout life. Independent research, critical analysis and the ability to communicate in a fluent, persuasive and effective manner both orally and on paper. Students will also have to develop their ability to think conceptually, examining such ideas as causation, change, continuity, reliability and bias as well as historiography. Above all we hope to foster a lasting and deep love for the subject, one that will stimulate a lifelong engagement for our pupils.
In Year 13 students study two units to complete their A Level studies in History.
Unit Three is a study of the Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform from c1780 to 1928.
Unit Four is a coursework unit based on historians’ interpretations of the origins of the Cold War.
They will also revise the units they studied in Year 12.
A high level of commitment is required for the A Level course. There will be a good deal of reading and sustained application is needed if a good grade to be achieved. This really is a course for those who are motivated and who enjoy the subject and who are prepared to work hard.
Why study History at A Level?
History is increasingly attracting students for a number of valid reasons. Above all, many pursue History because they love to engage with the past and find it stimulating and rewarding. We believe that this is the best reason for continuing with History at this level.
Some do so because it is considered by universities to be a very good academic subject, one that prepares students well in a range of cross curricular skills and that reflects true academic ability. The subject is highly regarded by admissions tutors. Some choose it because it forms part of a well balanced 'basket' of subjects that will allow the student to follow a particular course at University, perhaps English, Modern Languages or Economics. Others follow it because it can complement their 'basket' of subjects, showing breadth and variety in their abilities that will enhance their university application, say if they wish to pursue a career in medicine, engineering or business.

Content

  • Paper 3, Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, 1780-1928:
    • Aspects in Breadth:
      • Reform of parliament, c1780-1928
      • Changing influences in parliament: the impact of parliamentary reform, c1780-1928
    • Aspects in Depth:
      • Radical Reformers, c1790-1819
      • Chartism, c1838-1850
      • Contagious Diseases Acts and the campaign for their repeal, 1862-86
      • The Women’s Social and Political Union, 1903-14
      • Trades Union Militancy, 1915-27
  • Paper 4:
    • Coursework on the Origins of the Cold War
    • Students will research and then write up an enquiry (of between 3,000 to 4,000 words) into the historical interpretations of the causes of the Cold War based on the views of three historians. The assignment will assess the ability to carry out a historical enquiry, analysing and evaluating historical interpretations, and organising and communicating the findings.
  • Revision:
    • There will also be a revision module covering the Russia and China units which were studied in Year 12 as well as the units studied in Year 13 which will help students prepare for the three exam papers taken in May and June of the final year of the course.

Skills

Skills for the A Level include research, analysis and explanation, both oral and written.
Students will research the period both in a directed and an independent manner, using their knowledge in class debate as well as their essays. Aside from their core texts we have a growing library which all students are encouraged to access. Analysis is developed throughout the year, with deepening argument being demanded, as well as the examination and evaluation of key themes, cause, consequence, change and continuity.
Essay skills are paramount for this syllabus and writing essays is a key component of the syllabus.
Students will also develop critical document skills.
Using primary and secondary sources, students will be introduced to the full range of historical skills, including analysis, evaluation, cross referencing of sources, reaching a judgement based on sources as well as evaluating judgements in the light of evidence.
Students must also communicate effectively in discussion and on paper.

Homework

Regular reading is fundamental to this course, as well as the keeping of very organised notes.
Essays will form a major part of a student's workload, as well as source work.
Additional research and the preparation of a coursework diary are integral to the assessment of the course.

Assessment

The A Level will involve the assessment of all four units studied over the course of the two years of the A Level:

  • Paper 1: Russia, 1917-1991: From Lenin to Yeltsin (30% of the A Level).
    This examination lasts 2 hours 15 minutes.
    • Students answer three questions: one from Section A, one from Section B and one from Section C.
    • Section A comprises a choice of two essay questions that assess understanding of the period in breadth. Questions will normally cover periods of at least 10 years and target causation or consequence.
    • Section B comprises a choice of two essay questions that assess understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the Themes. Questions will normally cover periods equivalent to at least a third of the time span of the Themes. Causation, consequence, change, continuity, similarity, difference, significance could be included.
    • Section C comprises one compulsory question that assesses the ability to analyse and evaluate interpretations and target content specified in Historical interpretations for the relevant option.
    • Questions will be based on two extracts from historical interpretations totalling approximately 300 words.
  • Paper 2: Mao’s China from 1949-1976 (20% of the A Level).
    The examination lasts 1 hour 30 minutes.
    • Students answer two questions: one from Section A and one from Section B.
    • Section A comprises a compulsory two-part question for the option studied that assesses the ability to analyse and evaluate source material that is primary and/or contemporary to the period and target content specified in the Key topics for the relevant option.
    • Section B comprises a choice of three essay questions that assess understanding of the period in depth and target content specified in the key topics for the relevant option.
  • Paper 3 (30% of the A Level).
    Written examination, lasting 2 hours 15 minutes.
    • Students answer three questions: one from Section A, one from Section B and one from Section C.
    • Section A comprises one compulsory question on the Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform 1780-1928, assessing source analysis and evaluation skills (AO2).
    • Section B comprises a choice of essays that assess understanding of the period in depth.
    • Section C comprises a choice of essays that assess understanding of the period in breadth.
    • Total 60 marks.
  • Paper 4 (20% of the A Level).
    • The purpose of this coursework is to enable students to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of interpretations of history in a chosen question, problem or issue as part of an independently researched assignment.
    • The focus is on understanding the nature and purpose of the work of the historian. Students will be required to form a critical view based on relevant reading on the question, problem or issue. They will also be specifically required to analyse, explain and evaluate the interpretations of three historians.
    • Student will produce an historical essay of between 3,000-4,000 words which will consider the differences of interpretation over the causes of the Cold War.

Resources and Materials

  • Unit Three:
    • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, c1780-1928 by Peter Callaghan
    • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, c1780-1928 by Michael Scott-Baumann
  • Unit Four:
    • The Cold War, S. Phillips.
    • The Cold War, J.W. Mason.
    • America, Russia and the Cold War, W. LaFeber.
    • The Cold War, J.L. Gaddis.
    • A selection of historians’ views on the origins of the Cold War.

Latin

Introduction

The purpose of the Latin Pre-U course is to provide an understanding of some of the elements of Classical civilisation, literature and language which have had a great influence on our own, to increase experience by considering a wide range of issues. The course should be satisfying in itself and also provide a sound basis for further study.
It is also hoped in Runnymede that pupils' studies will increase their knowledge and understanding of their cultural heritage and of the world around them in Spain; that they will learn more of the language from which Spanish has evolved and English has borrowed enormously; and that they can analyse and develop the way they themselves use language and so use it more effectively.

Content

Language
A list of accidence and syntax needed is provided by the Examination Board. The vocabulary list learnt in Year 12 needs to be extended. No list of words is given by the board for the exam. The language work involves revision of syntax and accidence, knowing it in more detail than for IGCSE or in Year 12, vocabulary learning, practice of unprepared translation, particularly of verse passages. One important feature is the learning of principal parts of verbs.
Works by Ovid and Livy may be studied as general reading to prepare for the unprepared translation in these units.
Work on English-into-Latin translation (sentences and longer passages) needs to be done if this option is chosen by the pupils.

Literature
The set-text work (principally Cicero and Ovid) occupies a considerable time. Some of this has been studied in Year 12. Translation, literary appreciation and essay-writing all need to be practised.
(In both these areas, having small groups allows the possibility of flexibility and adapting the material to the needs, strengths and weaknesses of individual pupils. It is not possible or desirable to give at the start of a year a detailed plan of studies.)

Skills

Pupils should be learning to:

  • Understand original Latin texts through translation and comprehension questions, through having a good knowledge of the vocabulary, endings and syntax of Latin, and understanding of the different ways that Latin and English (and Spanish) work as languages; understand and respond personally to the texts studied, both prose and poetry, through translation and questions on context and on literary elements.

Homework

Homework will be given most days on which there are lessons. It will not normally be given for the following day. Most will be learning of accidence or vocabulary, unprepared translation into Latin or English, or preparation of Latin texts and writing commentaries and essays.

Assessment

The Year 12 and 13 course leads to the Pre-U Latin examination (equivalent to an A level) at the end of Year 13. There will be mock exams for Year 13 earlier in the year, where knowledge of the literature and unprepared translation will be tested.

Resources and Materials

Language work will be covered by dictation and use of photocopies, rather than with any text book. Wilson’s Latin Grammar and Kennedy’s Revised Latin Primer are available as grammar reference books. The Chamber’s/Murray Latin-English Dictionary (ex-Smith’s) is issued to all pupils. Latin Unseens for A-level by Carter and Unseens from Roman History, which contains both prose and verse passages and then photocopies of passages are mainly used to practise unprepared translation. Other books are available to meet the different requirements of different pupils.
Apart from the necessary text books and grammar books, the department has a well-stocked library of works on historical, linguistic and literary themes, and in particular many Latin and Greek works in translation which pupils are encouraged to borrow. For example, those reading extracts from the Aeneid are recommended to read Homer’s Odyssey.
"SALVE", the Runnymede Classics website, has information about the syllabus and help with the set books – if possible a copy of the text and copies of notes and questions given to pupils. It can be accessed by going to http://salve.runnymede-college.com.


Mathematics

Introduction

The new Maths A level (from 2017) now requires students to study elements from Pure Mathematics, Mechanics and Statistics. This enables pupils to have a much broader mathematical experience at A Level and helps provide a foundation for a wide range of higher education courses.
There are three overarching themes in the new Mathematics A Level:

  • Mathematical argument, language and proof
  • Mathematical problem solving
  • Mathematical modelling

These themes build on the skills developed in the IGCSE curriculum and are intended to develop a mathematician’s way of thinking.
A new element of the A level is the inclusion of a ‘large data set’ which supports the statistics element of the course. This requires much more understanding and analysis of data than previous syllabi and it is therefore important that we support the students with additional sessions to prepare them for this challenge.

The Mathematics department is unique in that it offers candidates two separate options in Mathematics, depending on the cohort option choices; the full A level qualification, or the AS qualification (half an A level).
Students who achieve a grade B or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study the full Mathematics A level. They will have 8 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school ‘Large Data Set Sessions’. They will have 3 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.
Students who achieve a grade C or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study towards the Mathematics AS level. They will have 4 lessons a week as well as periodic after-school ‘Large Data Set Sessions’. They will have 2 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

The linear style of the course means that material covered over the full two-year period will be tested on at the end of year 13.

AS Mathematics: 2/3 Pure and 1/3 applied (2 final examinations)
AS Pure Mathematics Topics
Algebraic Expressions, Quadratics, Equations and Inequalities, Graphs and Transformations, Straight line graphs, Circles, Algebraic Methods, Binomial Expansion, Trigonometry, Vectors, Differentiation, Integration and Exponentials and Logarithms.
AS Applied Mathematics Topics
Statistics (Data Collection, Measures of Location and Speed, Representations of Data, Correlation, Probability, Statistical Distributions, Hypothesis Testing) and Mechanics (Modelling, Constant Acceleration, Forces and Motion, Variable Acceleration).

A Level Mathematics: 2/3 Pure and 1/3 applied (3 final examinations)
Pure Mathematics Topics
Algebraic Expressions, Quadratics, Equations and Inequalities, Graphs and Transformations, Straight line graphs, Circles, Algebraic Methods, Binomial Expansion, Trigonometry, Vectors, Differentiation, Integration, Exponentials and Logarithms, Functions and Graphs, Sequences and Series, Radians, Parametric Equations and Numerical Methods.
Applied Mathematics Topics
Statistics (Data Collection, Measures of Location and Speed, Representations of Data, Correlation, Probability, Statistical Distributions, Hypothesis Testing, Normal Distribution) and Mechanics (Modelling, Constant Acceleration, Forces and Friction, Motion, Variable Acceleration, Moments, Projectiles).

The full topic schedules for this year can be found on the department website, under VI Form, AS Maths or Regular Maths:
AS Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_13_as_2019-20_la.pdf
Regular Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/year_13_2019-20_nh.pdf

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 13 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.
A full breakdown of all the skills taught within the A Level syllabus can be found in the A Level Specification on the department website:
AS Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/as-l3-mathematics-specification.pdf
Regular Maths: https://runnymedemathematics.weebly.com/uploads/4/0/6/7/40678035/a-level-l3-mathematics-specification.pdf

Homework

Homework is set after every double lesson and is expected to take around an hour. It will either be related to the content covered in class that day or week, or it will be a review task to give pupils the opportunity consolidate their understanding of a previously taught topic and enhance their memory of it in line with recent educational research. It may be a worksheet, textbook exercise or pack of exam style questions. Students will always be given optional extra challenge tasks so that they are able to challenge themselves appropriately. These homework tasks will rarely be marked by a teacher and students are expected to be responsible and independent in ensuring they seek help when necessary and make their corrections when marking it.
After every chapter students will be given a topic assessment to complete at home which will be marked by the teacher. This is designed to help students to consolidate their understanding and review the topic before moving on. Students are expected to use their notes to help them complete the work, therefore if they get less than 70% they are given extra support from their teacher outside of lessons in the form of a Maths Clinic.
We have high expectations of effort and expect every question on an assessment to be attempted in full. If a student finds they are unable to attempt a question they should either email their teacher directly for help, or see them outside of lessons before the homework deadline.

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing within the classroom every lesson, and is also informed by attainment on topic assessments completed at home.
In class students will also be assessed through formal tests each term. This will start with a baseline test at the beginning of the year to assess the summer work, and will then test the A Level material cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research. Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan.
Assessment timings are outlined in the schedule link above.
The external summative exams take place in June, 2 for the AS course (1 Pure and 1 Applied) and 3 for the A Level course (2 Pure and 1 Applied).

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the Year 2 Pure and Applied textbooks published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum, which are to be returned at the end of the course.
They will also be provided with a revision workbook later in the year to help support their revision for the end of year examinations.
The use of a graphical calculator will continue to be required.
Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website under Sixth form, New A Level, Year 2.
In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.


Physics

Introduction

Physics A Level from AQA provides a seamless transition to A Level from previous studies at IGCSE and develops students interest and enthusiasm for physics. The Year 13 course provides different starting points so teachers can choose to start the course with familiar or new topics. This allows the Physics department to develop a course that is not only challenging but academically stimulating for the students.
Four weekly classes of 80 minutes duration are dedicated to the study of physics over the two-year cycle. Normally, one of the four will be devoted to acquiring experimental skills through practical work in the laboratory. A full range of experiments centred mainly on mechanics, heat, light, oscillations, electricity and magnetism is undertaken.

Content

The full A Level course consists of a core content and an option module that allows students to pursue and area of physics that may be of more interest to them or relevant to an area of study at university.
Specification can be found at:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/specifications/AQA-7407-7408-SP-2015.PDF

  • Core Topics:
    • Measurements and their errors
    • Particles and radiation
    • Waves
    • Mechanics and materials
    • Electricity
    • Further mechanics and thermal physics
    • Fields and their consequences
    • Nuclear physics
  • Options
    • Astrophysics
    • Medical physics
    • Engineering physics
    • Turning points in physics
    • Electronics

Skills

The new A Level Physics course is designed to fully test students abilities to design, carry out, and communicate experimental procedures to a very high standard. The practical endorsement, now required when applying through UCAS to UK Universities, improves students investigative skills to a standard used by university departments around the world. The main skill foci are listed below.

1. To support and consolidate scientific concepts (knowledge and understanding). This is done by applying and developing what is known and understood of abstract ideas and models. Through practical work we are able to make sense of new information and observations, and provide insights into the development of scientific thinking.
2. To develop investigative skills. These transferable skills include:

  • Devising and investigating testable questions
  • Identifying and controlling variables
  • Analysing, interpreting and evaluating data.
  • To build and master practical skills such as:
  • Using specialist equipment to take measurements
  • Handling and manipulating equipment with confidence and fluency
  • Recognising hazards and planning how to minimise risk.

Homework

Will comprise of exam style questions once per week, which focuses on the core content in the syllabus and at least one online homework set through ISAAC PHYSICS, which provides opportunities for extension. In addition to these common homework tasks pupils will have the opportunity to study for the Oxford challenges, however, this does require additional study at home.

Assessment

Students will be assessed at the end of every topic, and before each reporting cycle. Students will also receive and end of year full Internal exam which counts towards their predicted grades for university. In year 12 the students will be assessed on the following topics:

  • Further mechanics and thermal physics
  • Fields and their consequences
  • Nuclear physics

And one of the following options:

  • Astrophysics
  • Medical physics
  • Engineering physics
  • Turning points in physics
  • Electronics

The final assessment is comprised of three external exam papers.

  • Paper 1 covers all material from year 12
  • Paper 2 covers all material from Year 13
  • Paper 3 covers questions based on classroom core practical’s and the additional option topic.

Resources and Materials

Theory classes are supported by excellent textbooks – endorsed by AQA – that are seldom used in class but form the basis for home study and revision exercises:
"Advanced Physics For You" by Keith Johnson Published by Oxford university press
www.isaacphysics.com
The pupils are also provided with a further range of texts that go further and deeper than syllabus requirements.
Practical work is carried out in a purpose-built physics laboratory with a full range of apparatus including multimeters, signal generators and cathode ray oscilloscopes. The laboratory is equipped with an interactive white board that greatly facilitates the viewing of experimental simulations. The pupils are encouraged to do their own independent research and build a bank of internet addresses for future reference.


Sociales

Introduction

El estudio de la Historia proporciona un conocimiento esencial del pasado que contribuye a la comprensión del presente. Asimismo, desarrolla una serie de capacidades y técnicas intelectuales propias del pensamiento abstracto y formal, tales como la observación, el análisis, la interpretación, la capacidad de compresión y el sentido crítico. El carácter vertebrador de la Historia, dentro del conjunto de las ciencias sociales, la convierte en eje ordenador del pensamiento y en fundamento de comprensión para todas las disciplinas vinculadas a la actividad humana. Por eso, dentro del ámbito de nuestra civilización occidental, la enseñanza de la Historia ha ocupado siempre un lugar preferente en la educación de los jóvenes.
La enseñanza de esta materia en Runnymede College está concebida como materia que ofrece al ciudadano español que desea ingresar en la universidad española la posibilidad de conocer la historia de su país. También, prepararle para superar pruebas de acceso a universidades privadas. De este modo, se dedica a lo largo de Year 13 una primera unidad temática a la Hispania romana; las tres siguientes se refieren a la Edad Media; cuatro estudian la Edad Moderna, y las ocho restantes la Edad Contemporánea.

Content

Tres períodos a la semana. Dos se dedican al desarrollo de los contenidos y otro a cultura general (lectura y comentario de textos, exposiciones orales y presentaciones usando medios digitales, prensa, noticias, artículos de opinión sobre temas de actualidad, televisión…)

  • Prehistoria. La Hispania romana.
  • La Península Ibérica en la Edad Media: Al-Ándalus.
  • La Península Ibérica en la Edad Media: Los reinos cristianos.
  • La Baja Edad Media. La crisis de los siglos XIV y XV.
  • Los Reyes Católicos: La construcción del Estado moderno.
  • La España del siglo XVI.
  • La España del Barroco.
  • El siglo XVIII: Los primeros Borbones.
  • La Crisis del Antiguo Régimen.
  • La construcción del Estado liberal.
  • El régimen de la Restauración.
  • Alfonso XIII: La crisis de la Restauración.
  • La II República.
  • La Guerra civil.
  • España durante el franquismo.
  • La España democrática.
  • Temas de Geografía Física Mundial

Skills

Queremos despertar en los alumnos la pasión por aprender y dotarles de las mejores herramientas para que puedan lograr su realización personal, ejerzan la ciudadanía activa, se incorporen a la vida adulta de manera satisfactoria y sean capaces de desarrollar un aprendizaje permanente a lo largo de la vida. Por todo ello, damos un tratamiento especial a competencias básicas que integren los diferentes aprendizajes y a que los estudiantes desarrollen sus habilidades lectoras, utilicen las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación e información, aprendan técnicas de estudio, mejoren la atención y desarrollen un razonamiento lógico que les ayude a interpretar y comprender el entorno y a encontrar diferentes soluciones para resolver problemas, sin olvidar la educación en valores.

Homework

A lo largo del curso se realizará una evaluación continua y progresiva del alumno donde se tendrá en cuenta su nivel de participación en las actividades realizadas en el aula, sus trabajos escritos y la preparación para debates y exposiciones orales. La asistencia es fundamental.

Assessment

A lo largo del curso se realizará una evaluación continua y progresiva del alumno donde se tendrá en cuenta su nivel de participación en las actividades realizadas en el aula, sus trabajos escritos y la preparación para debates y exposiciones orales. La asistencia es fundamental.

Resources and Materials

  • Material fotocopiado.
  • Material on line.
  • Prensa y comentarios de texto.
  • Material audiovisual y digital diverso.
  • Presentaciones digitales elaboradas por el departamento..
  • Herramientas y aplicaciones digitales

Spanish

Introduction

  • The Spanish department at Runnymede College aims to encourage their students to:
    • Develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning.
    • Develop understanding of the language in a variety of contexts and genres.
    • Communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in Spanish for a range of purposes.
    • Develop awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken.
    • Consider their study of the language in a broader context.
  • The Year 13 Spanish course enables students to:
    • Derive enjoyment and benefit from language learning.
    • Acquire knowledge, skills and understanding for practical use, further study and/or employment.
    • Enjoy reading a variety of literary texts.
    • Communicate with speakers of the language.
    • Take their place in a multilingual global society.

Content

Based on textbook AQA Spanish A Level Year 2, Oxford and Hodder Education

  • Term 1
    • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
      • 1) Multiculturalism in Hispanic society
        Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
        La convivencia
        • La convivencia de culturas
        • La educación
        • Las religiones
      • 2) Aspects of political life in the Hispanic world
        Jóvenes de hoy, ciudadanos de mañana
        • Los jóvenes y su actitud hacia la política: activismo o apatía.
        • El paro entre los jóvenes.
        • Su sociedad ideal.
        • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
        • C. Literature
          • La casa de Bernarda Alba, Federico García Lorca
          • Project: Analysis of Federico García Lorca
        • D. Grammar and vocabulary:
          Main grammar book:
          Test yourself
          These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
          Grammar revision, main points:
          • Present tenses
          • Imperfect and preterite tenses
          • Future
          • Conditional
          • Use of nouns and adjectives
          • Use of prepositions
          • Use of pronouns
          • Use of adverbs
        • E. Essay writing and translations.
          Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works every other week or more often.
          Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
        • F. Individual research project
          Students will start their research projects early in the academic year (September). From term 2, students will show their work to their teacher regularly so she can closely monitor their progress. By the middle of March every project should be finished.
      • Term 2
        • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
          Aspects of political life in the Hispanic world
          Students must study monarchies and dictatorships in relation to any relevant Spanish-speaking country or countries.
          • Monarquías y dictaduras
            • La dictadura de Franco.
            • La evolución de la monarquía en España.
            • Dictadores latinoamericanos.
          • Los movimientos populares
            • La efectividad de las manifestaciones y las huelgas.
            • El poder de los sindicatos.
            • Ejemplos de protestas sociales
        • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
        • C. Literature
          • Students will complete revision and essay writing of:
          • La casa de Bernarda Alba, Federico García Lorca
          • Film: Las 13 rosas, Emilio Martínez-Lázaro
        • D. Grammar and vocabulary
          These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
          Grammar revision, main points:
          • Imperative
          • Present subjunctive
          • Perfect subjunctive
          • Imperfect subjunctive
          • Pluperfect subjunctive
          • Uses of the subjunctive
          • Use and sequence of tenses
          • Use of conditional sentences
          • Use of the passive voice
        • E. Essay writing and translations
          Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works every other week or more often.
          Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
        • F. Individual research project
          Students will start their research projects early in the academic year (September). From term 2, students will show their work to their teacher regularly so she can closely monitor their progress. By the middle of March every project should be finished.
      • Term 3
        • A. AQA syllabus content (Revision)
          Students will complete and revise all the themes which have been studied for A Level and will do one-to-one practice in preparation for the oral exam.
        • B. Literature
          Revision: Las bicicletas son para el verano, by Fernando Fernán Gómez and La casa de Bernarda Alba, by Federico García Lorca.
        • C. Grammar and vocabulary:
          Revision of the two components will take place one period a week.
        • D. Essay writing and translations.
          Pupils will continue practising their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish (one/two periods a week).

      Skills

      • LISTENING: Show a clear understanding of the spoken language including regional varieties and different registers and demonstrate an ability to infer meaning
      • READING: Show a clear understanding of a range of written texts, including newspaper articles and literary texts and demonstrate an ability to infer meaning.
      • SPEAKING: Develop ideas and express and justify points of view effectively, respond readily and fluently and take the initiative, be able to deal appropriately with unpredictable elements.
      • WRITING: Show the ability to organise and structure a range of texts coherently, offer relevant information which addresses the requirements of the task, make effective use of a wide range of vocabulary and a variety of complex structures, use grammar, morphology and syntax in an accurate way.

      Homework

      • Learning vocabulary and verb tenses.
      • Reading comprehension texts.
      • Writing argumentative, narrative, descriptive and creative essays.
      • Reading literature.
      • Working through activities from the textbook.
      • Working through past papers.
      • Preparing oral presentations.
      • Researching for information.
      • Watching the news and series.
      • Reading newspapers and magazines in Spanish.
      • Practising their language skills outside school.

      Assessment

      Being a language, assessment takes place in the classroom naturally on a daily basis. Moreover, formal written work is set and marked by the teacher at least once a week. Vocabulary and verbs are assessed after completion of every sub-theme.
      Assessment is a very important part of this subject as it is essential that the teacher diagnoses the pupils' weaknesses and focuses on them in order for pupils to overcome them. Pupils will sit an internal exam at the end of every literary work studied.

      EXAM DESCRIPTION:
      The A level exam consists of three papers:

      • Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing.
        Duration: 2 hours 30 minutes; total raw mark: 100. 50% of the exam
      • 2. Paper 2: Writing
        Duration: 2 hours; total raw mark: 80. 20% of the exam
      • 3. Paper 3: Speaking
        Duration: 21-23 minutes (including 5 minutes supervised preparation time); total raw mark: 60nd 25 (35 of their individual research project and 25 of the stimulus). 30% of the exam.

      Resources and Materials

      • The following resources are used:
      • AQA Spanish A Level (Year 1 and Year 2), Oxford
      • AQA Spanish A level, Kerboodle Books.
      • www.runnymedespanish.weebly.com
      • Acción Gramática, Hodder Murray
      • Test yourself- Spanish Grammar, McGraw Hill
      • Practice Makes Perfect, Complete Spanish Grammar, McGraw Hill
      • Spanish verb tenses, Practice makes Perfect, MCGraw Hill
      • Gramática básica del estudiante de español, Editorial Difusión
      • Las bicicletas son para el verano, Fernando Fernán Gómez
      • La casa de Bernarda Alba, Federico García Lorca.
      • Ocho apellidos vascos, Emilio Martínez Lázaro.
      • Regular reading of Spanish-speaking newspapers and magazines is required. These are a few suggestions:
      • El Mundo, El País, ABC, La Razón, Telva, Viajar, Traveler, Expansión, Tiempo, Fotogramas, Car and Driver, Nuevo Estilo, Casa 10, Leer, etc.
      • Regular viewing of the following programmes is also required:
      • Telediario
      • Informe Semanal
      • La 2 noticias
      • Ciudades para el siglo XXI
      • Documentos TV
      • Repor
      • Para todos la 2
      • Un país para comérselo
      • Españoles por el mundo (all of the above can be found in www.rtve.es)

Spanish Lengua

Introduction

Este curso se corresponde con 2º de Bachillerato dentro del sistema español de la enseñanza no obligatoria en el marco de la LOE. Nuestro programa de estudios desarrolla los contenidos que el Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia y la Comunidad de Madrid han prescrito para los currículos de esta etapa educativa, pero solo aquellos que no quedan ya incluidos en el currículo del sistema británico.
La principal finalidad de esta materia es aportar un nivel lingüístico superior a los alumnos españoles que se educan en el sistema británico, así como profundizar y analizar con mayor detalle textos literarios escritos en español que les ayuden a su vez a conocer y a valorar la cultura española. Además este curso tiene como objetivo enseñarles a valorar el español como cuarto idioma más hablado del mundo y darles la oportunidad de ser verdaderamente bilingües.
Este curso tiene unas características especiales que lo diferencian de los demás, debido a que, además de la parte correspondiente al sistema educativo español, preparamos el A Level de Español, perteneciente al currículo educativo inglés. Esta parte del currículo queda totalmente integrada en el área de Comentario de Texto y del estudio de la Literatura de 2º de Bachillerato. La enseñanza de esta materia en Runnymede College ofrece al estudiante que desea ingresar en la universidad española la posibilidad de prepararle para superar pruebas de acceso a universidades privadas.

Content

Además de afianzar sus conocimientos lingüísticos a un nivel superior y de conocer y analizar algunos textos literarios desde el siglo XVI, el curso incluye la preparación para el ALevel de Spanish. Para ello, a partir de enero, los alumnos se prepararán todos los contenidos de este examen (Listening, Reading, Speaking, Writing & Literature) contenidos que quedan inmersos en las áreas de Comentario de Textos y Literatura .

  • Lengua: comunicación, gramática y ortografía (ejercicios prácticos en clase).
  • Comentario de texto y (Listening, Reading, Speaking, Writing): práctica oral y escrita.
  • Literatura: lectura, comentario: oral y escrito.
    • La Celestina, (película basada en el texto de F. de Rojas).
    • El Lazarillo de Tormes, (película basada en el texto literario anónimo).
    • Poesía: San Juan de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, Garcilaso de la Vega y Santa Teresa De Jesús.
    • Narrativa: Cervantes y El Quijote.
    • Teatro: Fuente Ovejuna de Lope de Vega y La vida es sueño de Calderón.
    • Relatos cortos: (distintos autores españoles e hispanoamericanos) “Muerte constante más allá del amor”, “La gallina degollada” y “El Desayuno”.
    • Los Santos Inocentes (película basada en el texto de M. Delibes). (Primer trimestre).
    • La colmena (película basada en el texto de CJ Cela). (Primer trimestre)
    • Las bicicletas son para el verano, de F. Fernán Gómez (texto y película: Literature A Level).
    • La casa de Bernarda Alba, texto de García Lorca (repaso) que se corresponde con Literature del A Level.

Skills

Los alumnos adquirirán la capacidad de generar, de interpretar y de evaluar información que provenga de textos tanto orales como escritos de los diferentes contextos de la vida social y cultural, especialmente del ámbito académico y de los medios de comunicación. Afianzarán sus hábitos de lectura y de aprendizaje y desarrollarán la capacidad de expresarse y de interactuar oralmente y por escrito mediante discursos coherentes, correctos y adecuados a distintas situaciones y finalidades comunicativas. Analizarán e interpretarán la diversidad plurilingüe utilizarán, asimismo, las fuentes de información de forma crítica para su análisis. Además, interpretarán y valorarán críticamente las obras literarias, identificando los elementos que configuran su naturaleza artística y relacionándolos con la tradición cultural y social reconociendo en ellas la proyección individual y colectiva del ser humano, entre otras competencias.

Homework

Se realizará una evaluación continua y progresiva del alumno donde se tendrá en cuenta su nivel de participación en las actividades realizadas en el aula, sus trabajos escritos y la preparación para debates y exposiciones orales.

Assessment

Se realizará una evaluación continua y progresiva del alumno donde se tendrá en cuenta su nivel de participación en las actividades realizadas en el aula, sus trabajos escritos y la preparación para debates y exposiciones orales.

Resources and Materials

  • Libros de texto de la ESO, Primero y Segundo de Bachillerato de diversas editoriales.
  • AQA Spanish A Level Year 2.
  • Prensa y comentarios de texto. Material audiovisual y digital diverso.
  • Fotocopias de exámenes ya realizados de A2 y A Level.
  • Libros de lectura. Diccionarios.