ACADEMIC

SIXTH FORM

A Level
Curriculum

A Level Curriculum

Academic: A levels, IELTS & the EPQ

A levels

Advanced Levels offer students the right mixture of breadth and depth, allowing them to go into detail and develop strong levels of knowledge and skills in the subjects that interest them most. There is also an opportunity to study a range of subjects, combining Mathematics with creative and Humanities-based subjects, for example.

A levels are valued worldwide and ensure that students are given offers to study at universities in the UK, USA, Spain, and elsewhere in Europe. They are globally recognised qualifications that we believe gets the very best out of our students.

Students study three or four A level subjects, and take their final examinations at the end of Year 13.

There are numerous assessments over the two years, including internal exams at the end of Year 12, which play an important part in deciding on students’ predicted grades for university applications.

You can find more information about each of the A levels in our Options Booklet.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

Runnymedians should be proud of being completely fluent in English. All sixth formers study for and take the IELTS examinations in English language proficiency at the end of Year 12. This fulfils a possible criterion which some universities ask for as part of the application process, and is also a useful means of sustaining students’ written and oral fluency in English.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

Alongside A levels, our sixth formers can opt to complete an EPQ. This is a qualification designed to extend and develop students’ abilities beyond the A level syllabus. It is worth half an A level (28 UCAS points). Students have to plan and carry out research to be able to produce a written report of approximately 5000 words, or in the case of practical projects, an artefact or a production plus a written report of a minimum 1000 words. They can take inspiration from something touched on in class or something unrelated to their studies (for example they could do an EPQ on a topic within Psychology, Philosophy or Computer Science). To begin with there are weekly lessons to learn about the skills needed to complete the EPQ, and afterwards students have to work independently to complete the project. The EPQ is demanding, and is only recommended for our most hardworking and organised sixth formers, who want to explore an area that goes beyond their curriculum or an area not covered in their A level choices. There is a dedicated EPQ Coordinator and individual specialist supervisors who guide students in this process.

Quimica 900px - A Level Curriculum

Introduction

The AS and A Levels are now linear qualifications, so that all student work will be submitted and assessed at the end of the course.

AS Art & Design is a completely stand-alone course. This means that if a student does the AS and then decides to go on to do the A Level, the mark achieved at AS will not count towards their A Level mark and grade.

The courses offer more flexibility to students. Students can choose only AS in year 12. If they then decide to do the full A Level, they can do the A Level in one year. The full A Level is now a 2 year course.

A Level incorporates and builds on the aims of GCSE Art and Design but requires something more than a general ability in the subject. It will demand an increased maturity and competence of candidates in practical and theoretical activities and in those relating to critical, historical and contextual aspects of the subject.

The course is intended to meet the needs of the following types of candidates:

  • a) those who will undertake further studies in Art and Design.
  • b) those who will study subjects or take up careers for which a background in Art and Design is relevant.
  • c) those who, while having an interest in and aptitude for the subject are not intending to undertake further studies in Art and Design.

Pupils receive 8 40 minute periods of Art per week.

Content

The AS is comprised of two components:

Skills

The skills to be assessed during the course are:

Homework

Students are expected to supplement their classwork with five hours of homework a week where they develop, explore and consolidate their work.

Assessment

There is continual assessment of all skills.

Digital usage in this subject

All students have their own laptops. These are used constantly for investigation and for writing their coursework essay. Some might create digital artwork.

Average time spent each homework

Students are expected to spend 5 hours per week on homework.

Resources and Materials

All students need basic drawing and painting equipment for work at home. A high quality digital camera is today more or less an essential tool.

The Art Department possesses a well-stocked, continually updated library of books and videos which form an integral part of the course and are supplemented by the internet.

Introduction

Pupils follow topics 1 to 4 of Edexcel GCE (Salters Nuffield) in Biology in year 12. There are 8 periods of forty minutes per week of which two double lessons per week are usually devoted to practical work. Emphasis is placed on relevance of Biology to everyday life, and ethical issues in science. The impact of science on the fields of medicine and environment also feature prominently.

Content

Skills

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 4-5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports and ongoing revision and learning tasks.

Assessment

There will be an assessment after each topic, and an end of year 12 mock exam that assesses all 4 topics. The grades in these five exams will form a basis of the predicted grade for the UCAS form (university application) in year 13.

Digital usage in this subject

Digital usage at home- Students are given physical homework booklets to complete however the mark scheme to these booklets is found on google classroom which they should be using to correct their work. They also have to do something called ´retrieval roulette´ which is a spreadsheet on numbers that randomly assorts questions for them to answer- they should be using this each week to revise a section of the content. Students choose to either the or write their notes. Additional websites students can use include Khan Academy for videos and Physics and Maths tutor for additional past paper questions. 

Resources and Materials

Edexcel A Level Science Series: AS Biology Students Book (Ann Fullick).

Introduction

The A level Chemistry syllabus places practical work in a central, all-encompassing role throughout the course. In this way, the essence of Chemistry, its use and significance in society are emphasised, and how it provides a vehicle for understanding, acquisition of vital skills and enjoyment. As part of the new A level course pupils now complete a series of Core Practicals (16 in total) which leads to the awarding of the practical endorsement qualification at the end of Year 13. In this way, A levels pupils around the world will enter university in the UK (or elsewhere) sure of possessing the basic skills required to succeed in a science based degree.
The inherent objective of recent changes to the syllabus has been to update the Chemistry taught in schools to incorporate more modern aspects of the subject, new techniques, and contemporary issues that affect our lives.

Content

A level – Year 12

Term 1:

Term 2 / 3:

Skills

The following key skills are embedded in the curriculum:

Homework

Students can expect to receive up to 5 hours of homework per week. This will be in the form of written assignments, practice questions, practical reports, online quizzes and learning tasks.

Assessment

Examinations:

Digital usage in this subject

A level Chemistry students access all resources including topic slides, worksheets, syllabus specification, textbook answers and mark schemes via google classroom. Core practical write ups are handed in as pdf format and marked online in google classroom. The marked practical write ups are stored electronically but also printed out and stored in a physical folder kept in the laboratory.

Weekly homework is set on the application Seneca.

Resources and Materials

The following materials are provided:

Applications and websites habitually used

Introduction

Pupils who have chosen Classical Greek as one their A-Level options will study the OCR A-Level Classical Greek course.

Content

Language. For a comprehensive list of the grammatical and syntactic features studied:

www.ocr.org.uk/Images/220709-specification-accredited-a-level-gce-classical-greek-h444.pdf
Vocabulary 1200 words

Literature. The set texts studied are:

Thucydides Histories 6.19-6.32
Plutarch Alcibiades Ⅹ.1.1-ⅩⅥ.5 (in Greek), Ⅰ-Ⅹ, ⅩⅦ-ⅩⅩⅡ (in English)
Homer Odyssey, 1.213-444, 6.85-331 (in Greek), rest of Odyssey 6 and 7 (in English)

Skills

Pupils will be able to develop an appropriate level of competence in Classical Greek; to acquire the language skills which enable learners to read literary texts, both prose and verse, in the original language; to develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, the literary, historical and cultural features of the ancient world; to acquire the literary skills which enable learners to read ancient literature, both prose and verse, in its original language with appropriate attention to literary techniques, styles and genres; to apply analytical and evaluative skills at an appropriate level which show direct engagement with original texts in the ancient language; to make an informed personal response to the material studied; to begin to develop a sensitive and analytical approach to language generally.

Homework

Homework consists of vocabulary learning, grammar and syntax exercises, translation, narrative analysis and essay writing. Homework will be set once per week, on Google Classroom.

Assessment

There is one internal examination in Year 12, and a mock examination in Year 13, before the public examination. Translation skills, vocabulary and set text knowledge, and literary appreciation will be tested regularly.

Resources and Materials

Greek Beyond GCSE, OCR Anthology for Classical Greek A Level. Worksheets and booklets produced by the department.

Introduction

Drama and Theatre is a creative, analytical and evaluative A-level subject, which has both practical and theoretical components. Like all subjects, it a two-year linear A-level which has practical assessments in both Years 12 and 13, before a final three-hour written exam.

Content

In Year 12, students will focus on Component 2 of the Drama and Theatre A-level. This involves devising a piece of drama from a stimulus, working in groups to create an original and engaging short play. They must then write a 3,000 word piece of coursework exploring their creative process, and also linking their devised drama to a practitioner, usually the founder of theatrical naturalism: Konstantin Stanislavski. The devised piece will be filmed and internally marked, before being externally moderated by the AQA exam board.

Students will also study the Ancient Greek tragedy ‘Antigone’ by Sophocles, exploring it both practically and analytically, in preparation for the final Component 1 A-level exam at the end of Year 13.

Students will also watch live theatre productions throughout the year, before discussing and compiling notes on the actors’ performances, the directorial choices, and the design elements used, again as preparation for a section of the final exam.

Skills

Students will develop their practical drama skills, becoming more confident in their use of their voices and physicality. They will develop teamwork, script-writing and imaginative skills through devising. They will also be able to effectively describe, analyse and evaluate dramatic choices, whether from the perspective of a performer, director or designer.

Homework

Students will be given a range of homework tasks – writing essays and presentations, learning lines, annotating scripts, or reading play extracts.

Assessment

In Year 12, students’ devised pieces will be performed and filmed, and they will also complete and hand in their 3,000 explorative coursework related to their devised pieces.

Digital usage in this subject

Students use Google Education as a multifaceted digital resource. In particular, they write scripts for their group devised pieces using shared google docs. They also upload work and check notices on google classroom, and take short quizzes using google forms. Evaluative presentations on theatre productions are created and delivered using Keynote.

On YouTube, students watch short performances, TED talks on design elements and monologues to inspire their own vocal and physical choices as actors. Streamed versions of theatre performances may be accessed from the National Theatre website and others (https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/ntathome).

Students may also film each other using the video functions of their iPads, in order to assess and improve their performance choices.

Resources and Materials

Most final pieces will be performed either in the school or in a theatre hired specially for the purpose, so students have the opportunity to work in appropriate theatrical conditions.

Applications and websites habitually used

BBC Bitesize; AQA assessment resources

Introduction

Economics is a social science that looks at how we share out scarce resources to satisfy human needs and wants. We place the consumer at the heart of the subject and consider how we might best use the factors of production to maximise welfare.

At Runnymede we offer the AQA economics course, which is a two year course leading to three exams at the end of year 13. Students are also expected to take the stand-alone AS exam at the end of year 12, giving them a separate qualification which offers a benchmark on their progress.

Content

There are two units in year 12, one focusing on microeconomics and one focusing on macroeconomics:
Microeconomics: here we look at the operation of markets and the challenges of market failure. We develop models of how a market works (demand and supply, the price mechanism, efficiency) and then explore how this applies to real life. Students are expected to be critical of the models we use and to understand how their limitations create challenges for policy makers when markets fail.

Macroeconomics: here we look at the operation of the economy and the challenge of achieving the objectives of growth, full employment, low inflation and a reasonable balance of payments. We develop models of the economy (circular flow, AD/AS analysis) and apply these to the current economic environment. Students are expected to have a good knowledge of the developments of the UK economy and government policies over the past 15 years.

Skills

Economics is a challenging subject which requires a good level of numeracy and literacy. Students are expected to have at least a B in Maths and B in English iGCSE, if they wish to join the course. In general the students who do best at economics are interested in the world around them and are happy to read around the subject.

Homework

Regular homework will be set. The normal routine is for students to do one short homework during the week and a longer homework over the weekend.

Assessment

There are two 90 minute exams, one for micro and one for macro. Each exam has two sections: section A consists of 20 multiple choice questions (20 marks) and section B consists of data response questions (50 marks).

Digital usage in this subject

All students use Google Classroom to access resources, homework tasks, online quizzes as well as study and revision advice. Recommended websites and videos will be posted through Google Classroom.
Students may also be asked to use Pages, Keynote and Numbers to produce work and to collaborate using Google Education apps including Docs, Slides and Forms.

Resources and Materials

Students are given a resource pack at the start of term which contains the basic resources which will be used to deliver the content of the course. Resources are then developed on an ongoing basis for each class as student progress is assessed. As such, each course is slightly different, depending upon student needs.

Apps and websites habitually used

The following websites are also used for assessment and revision resources:
Tutor2u: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/blog
Physics and Maths tutor: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/past-papers/a-level-economics/
We also expect students to be reading UK based Economics and Business news regularly. Students can choose their own sources but we recommend:
BBC Business News: https://www.bbc.com/news/business
The Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/
The Economist: https://www.economist.com/
Helpful revision videos are available from EconPlusDal: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=econplusdal

tutor2u.net

Blog

Economics news, explanations and enrichment for Economics students and teachers. (50 kB)

https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/blog

PMT

A-Level Economics Papers – PMT

Past papers for AQA, Edexcel, OCR, CAIE and WJEC Economics A-Levels

3 Jul 2015 (66 kB)

https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/past-papers/a-level-economics/

BBC News

Business News – BBC News

The latest BBC Business News: breaking personal finance, company, financial and economic news, plus insight and analysis into UK and global markets. (9 kB)

https://www.bbc.com/news/business

ft.com

Financial Times

News, analysis and comment from the Financial Times, the worldʼs leading global business publication

The Economist

The Economist | World News, Economics, Politics, Business & Finance

Authoritative global news and analysis. Offering fair-minded, fact-checked coverage of world politics, economics, business, science and tech, culture and more (2 kB)

Introduction

Like several other subjects, the English Literature AS specification has changed this year. However, we are pleased that the Edexcel board continues to offer a wide range of interesting and challenging texts for our sixth-formers to study. Pupils are taught a total of 8 lessons by two different teachers.

Content

This year’s Year 12 students will be preparing for an internal exam on the following texts:

Skills

Homework

In addition to classes on set books there are units of work on close reading and criticism. Essays are the main form of homework, though supplementary reading and other exercises are set from time to time. There is usually one essay per week for Year 12. Students of English Literature are expected to spend at least six hours per week on the subject outside class time. They are expected to take a thoughtful interest in the arts and other adjacent areas of study.

Assessment

Ongoing internal assessment is carried out during the year through essays and a Christmas examination. The student sits their main internal examination in the summer term.

Digital usage in this subject

All students use Google Classroom to access resources and homework tasks, as as well as study and revision advice. Recommended websites and videos will be posted through Google Classroom. Most teaching resources (such as Study Guides to A level English Literature texts) are shared with pupils via Google Classroom.

Students may also be asked to use Pages, Keynote and Numbers to produce work and to collaborate using Google Education apps including Docs, Slides and Forms. Some members of the department also use the Showbie app. Pupils are regularly asked to work collaboratively (in groups, pairs etc) and to present ideas to the class. This will often involve a digital element (usually Keynote).

Pupils may also use digital versions of texts in the classroom for annotation, although books are preferred. Where books are inaccessible pupils may refer to digital texts. Film versions which aid understanding of texts in performance can be found on the film page of the Runnymede website.

Massolit is a key academic resource for learning and revision.

Average time spent each homework

One hour

Typical tasks set

  • Consulting resources on Google Classroom
  • Producing presentations
  • Collaborative work
  • Research
  • Reading exemplar/modelled work from teachers/peers

Resources and Materials

The school library and the English Department book collection offer a wide range of background reading in all genres, from the medieval times to the present day.

Apps and websites habitually used

  • Google Classroom
  • Showbee
  • Intranet film page
  • Massolit

Introduction

Languages are a key component of education at Runnymede College, with all students studying French up to IGCSE in Year 11 and a large number continuing in the Sixth Form. The study of French provides students with a lifelong skill in communicating in a widely spoken language of continued global importance, and the experience of doing so opens students up to a different culture and gives them the tools necessary to learn other languages in the future.

At A level the examination specifications demand that students use their language skills to respond to the world around them in a far more analytical way than previously. New structures and a more advanced vocabulary are required to support the more nuanced style of communication needed to express ideas clearly and subtly. Far greater use is made of authentic materials and students study history, literature and film to give them a broader sense of French culture and to give real context to their studies.

French is a popular subject at “A” level as the results at IGCSE (A* /A mainly) allow many students to opt for it. We are glad to see that it is becoming more and more common for our students to choose a university course with a language component. The school decided some time ago to offer an AS level and an A level in different blocks so most students can do it if they wish.

Content

Course structure - AQA Board - AS

Paper 1 Listening - Reading - Translation
Paper 2 Writing ( Literature & Translation)
Paper 3 Speaking

Skills

Skills to develop orally for paper 3.
Students need to develop language skills that allow them to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in spoken French. They must ensure that they apply their listening skills in this task to permit natural and logical interaction.

The assessment criteria reward students for:

What students need to learn for paper 3.
Students are required to attain language skills that enable them to communicate effectively and confidently on a variety of topics and issues. Moreover, they will need to be able to supply facts, opinions and improvise language in an unrehearsed situation. They will also need to be able to respond appropriately to unpredictable questions and statements. They should be accustomed to responding to open questions, supplying considered and informed responses.

The assessment criteria reward students for:

quality of language

accuracy
range of lexis

response (development)

understanding (relevance, opinion)

stimulus-specific
general topic area

literature and the arts

Students would be expected to undertake in-depth study of a substantial French-language text, play or film. They would need to consider and demonstrate understanding of the following:

Skills to develop for paper 1 and 2.a
Students should develop language skills that give them the ability to communicate effectively, accurately and confidently in French language writing, to translate accurately from French into English, and to adequately understand spoken and written French. Students will be expected to show knowledge and understanding of and have the skills to deploy adequate grammar and structures.

Students will be assessed for the following:

Section A Listening

Section B Reading and transfer of meaning.

Section C written response to a stimulus exercise.

content and response
quality of language

Homework

Students listen to items of news on a regular basis. We think homework is of paramount importance in the learning process as it enables the students to work on their own and consolidate their knowledge and assess their progress. Students have homework practically every day. Regular testing takes place at the beginning of the lesson. Students are required to write essays and finish a unit of their text book. They often have to research a topic and prepare a presentation for the class.

Assessment

Year 12
Board: AQA

Terms

Sept- Oct

Theme 1: la famille
Theme 2: le patrimoine

1.1, 4.1
1.2, 4.2
1.3, 4.3 résumé et vocabulaire

Nov- Dec

Theme 1: Cyber-société
Theme 2: Musique francophone

2.1, 5.1
2.2, 5.2
2.3, 5.3 résumé et vocabulaire

Jan: MOCK

Jan- March

Theme 2: Cinéma
Film

6.1
6.2
6.3 résumé et vocabulaire

April- May

Stretching to A level requirement
Developing all skills up to A level standard
Study skills for independent research.
Dossier: cinéma et littérature

Theme 1: Bénévolat
3,1
3,2
3,3

Digital usage in this subject

Pupils use Google Classroom to access resources, homework tasks and online assessment. Revision advice and suggested websites and videos are also posted here.

Pupils frequently use Pages and Keynote to produce written work and Voice Record for speaking assignments and the digital version of the textbook for listening exercises. For collaborative tasks pupils use Google Docs, Slides and Forms.

Average time spent each homework

40 mins

Typical tasks set

Consulting resources on Google Classroom

Completing research

Writing essays

Creating presentations

Collaborative work on Google Docs

Listening to French language music

Watching French language films

Resources and Materials

Apps and websites habitually used

Google Classroom

Digital version of textbook: https://www.kerboodle.com/

Departmental website: https://relevantideas.weebly.com/

Vocabulary revision: https://quizlet.com/

Online quizzes: https://www.blooket.com/ 

Online quizzes: https://kahoot.com/

Video resources: https://www.youtube.com/

Video resources: https://vimeo.com/ 

News website: https://www.francetvinfo.fr/

Newspaper: https://www.lemonde.fr/

Newspaper: https://www.courrierinternational.com/ 

Online dictionary: https://www.wordreference.com/

Introduction

Students who achieve a grade A* or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study Mathematics AND Further Mathematics A levels (two A level qualifications). They will complete the full Mathematics A level course in Year 12 (see details on A level Mathematics), then move onto the Further Mathematics A level modules in Year 13.
All external exams for both A level qualifications are taken at the end of Year 13.
They will have 16 forty minute lessons a week. They will have 7 compulsory external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

Students will study four modules in Year 13 that will make up the Further Mathematics A level; two Pure and two Applied, each with an examination that will count for 25% of the A level.

Pure

Core Pure 1
Complex Numbers, Argand Diagrams, Series, Roots of Polynomials, Volumes of Revolution, Matrices, Linear Transformations, Proof by Induction, Vectors.

Core Pure 2
Complex Numbers, Series, Methods in Calculus, Volumes of Revolution, Polar Coordinates, Hyperbolic Functions, Methods in Differential Equations, Modelling with Differential Equations.

Applied

Two options out of:

Further Mechanics 1
Momentum and Impulse, Work, Energy and Power, Elastic Strings and Springs, Elastic Collisions in One Dimension, Elastic Collisions in Two Dimensions.

Decision Mathematics 1
Algorithms, Graphs and Networks, Algorithms on Graphs, Route Inspection, The Travelling Salesman Problem, Linear Programming, The Simplex Algorithm, Critical Path Analysis.

Further Statistics 1
Discrete Random Variables, Poisson, Geometric and Negative Binomial Distributions, Hypothesis Testing, Central Limit Theorem, Chi Squared Tests, Probability Generating Functions, Quality of Tests.

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 12 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.

Homework

Throughout the course, students are expected to carry out ongoing independent practice and complete unfinished class work in their own time. This is referred to as bookwork and uses the Edexcel textbooks that every student is issued with.
At the end of each chapter, an independent Self Review task will be issued that students must complete within one week, then self mark once the mark scheme is released. An effort rating (out of 5 stars) will be issued by the teacher to assess the quality to which this has been completed.

Assessment

Self Review homework tasks are to prepare students to complete assessed Checkpoints in class. These could cover between 1 and 3 chapters. If students complete Self Reviews properly, they should be well prepared to test their skills in a Checkpoint and thereby solidify their knowledge.
Students will also be assessed formally throughout the course as follows:

Year 12

  1. September Baseline Test
  2. November Assessment
  3. January Assessment
  4. March Assessment
  5. June Assessment

All material is tested cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research. Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan. These assessments are all considered when forming the predicted grade, with more emphasis on the latter assessments.

Year 13

  1. December Assessment
  2. March Mock Exams
  3. Final external exams:
    • Mathematics: Pure 1, Pure 2, Applied
    • Further Mathematics: Core Pure 1, Core Pure 2, then TWO out of Further Mechanics 1, Decision Maths 1, Further Statistics 1

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the CP1, CP2, D1 and FM1 textbooks published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum, which are to be returned at the end of the course. The use of a graphical calculator will continue to be required. Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website (www.runnymedemathematics.weebly.com) under under VI Form, Further Maths, Core Pure 1 & 2 and Further Applied. In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook, Google Classroom, printed handouts and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.

Introduction

Geography is the study of the physical features of the earth’s surface and the variety of human responses to the challenges and opportunities which these present.

The aims of the Geography A Level are for students:

Content

Area of Study 1: Dynamic Landscapes

Area of Study 2: Dynamic Places

Field work and research is a vital component of the A Level course and all students are expected to do a minimum of 4 days of field work as part of the course. Students will be taken on a residential field trip to help support their development of data collection techniques.

Skills

Summary of methods used in the course

Summary of skills developed in the course
The course requires students to:

Homework

Students will be set homework every lesson. Homework tasks range from note taking, revision, research, exam practice, essay questions to preparing for a presentation.

Assessment

The students have two internal exams in the summer term:

  • The assessment consists of three sections.
  • The paper may include multiple-choice questions, short open, open response, calculations and resource-linked questions. The examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions.
  • The assessment consists of three sections
  • The paper may include multiple-choice questions, short open, open response, calculations and resource-linked questions. The examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions.

Throughout the course, students will also be assessed via homework, class work and end of topic tests.

Digital usage in this subject

  • In Geography we use Google Classroom. 
  • We also encourage students to use certain websites for research tasks 
  • We use programmes for certain tasks – e.g. numbers, google sheets, google forms
  • We use add ons for other tasks – e.g. jam board
  • On occasion we use iPads/ iPhone cameras for filming 
  • We also use apps for some tasks e.g. weather apps, decibel meters, etc
  • We may encourage students to watch documentaries online too
  • We use exam board websites for certain resources – e.g. specification, advice

Average time spent each homework

3 hours

Typical tasks set

  • Research key facts
  • Make a presentation or infographic
  • Design data collection methods (e.g. bi-polar surveys)
  • Display data using digital skills (e.g. numbers, sheets)

Resources and Materials

Apps and websites habitually used

Introduction

History is a popular and prestigious choice as an A level at Runnymede. The department aims to provide a stimulating, challenging, enriching and rewarding programme that provides our students with a broad understanding of the subject.
Students will learn to use all the skills of a historian, understanding that the subject has a methodology that is unique yet one which will be applicable to a wide range of situations throughout life. These skills include independent research, critical analysis and the ability to communicate in a fluent, persuasive and effective manner both orally and on paper. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their ability to think conceptually, examining such ideas as causation, change, continuity, reliability and bias as well as historiography. Above all we hope to foster a lasting and deep love for the subject, one that will stimulate a lifelong engagement in our students and equip them with skills which will help them make sense of the world in which they live.
A high level of commitment is required for the A Level course. There will be a good deal of reading and sustained application is needed if a good grade to be achieved. This is a course for those who are motivated and who enjoy the subject and who are prepared to work hard.

Why study History at A Level

History is increasingly attracting students for a number of reasons. Above all, many pursue History because they love to engage with the past and find it stimulating and rewarding. We believe that this is the best reason for continuing with History at this level.
Some do so because it is considered by universities to be a very valuable academic subject, one that prepares students well in a range of transferable skills and that reflects true academic ability. The subject is highly regarded by admissions tutors. Some choose History because it forms part of a well balanced selection of subjects that will allow them to develop the skills to follow a particular course at university, perhaps whether it be History, Politics, International Relations, Economics, PPE, Law, English, or Modern Languages. Others follow it because it can complement their choice of subjects, showing a breadth and variety that will strengthen their university application, for example if they wish to pursue a career in medicine, engineering or business. As an A level subject it works well as a complement to Mathematics and the Sciences.

Content

  • Russia, 1917–91: from Lenin to Yeltsin
  • Communist Government in the USSR, 1918-1985
  • Industrial and Agricultural Change, 1917-85
  • Control of the People, 1917-85
  • Social Developments, 1917-85
  • What explains the Fall of the USSR, 1985-1991
  • Mao’s China, 1949-1976
  • Establishing Communist Rule, 1949-57
  • Agriculture and Industry, 1949-65
  • The Cultural Revolution and its Aftermath, 1966-76
  • Social and Cultural Changes, 1949-76
  • Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform, 1780-1928
  • Reform of parliament, c1780-1928
  • Changing influences in parliament: the impact of parliamentary reform, c1780-1928

Skills

The A level History course enables students to:

Homework

Homework is set weekly and consists of about one hour of work. Supplementary reading and research will be required.

Assessment

Regular short tests, evidence exercises and past questions form part of the assessment regime.
The final exam is made up of three separate exam papers, each taken on a different day. Pupils will be prepared thoroughly for each paper and the types of questions they use.

Digital usage in this subject

All students use Google Classroom to access resources, homework tasks, online quizzes as well as study and revision advice. Recommended websites and videos will be posted through Google Classroom.

Students may also be asked to use Pages, Keynote and Numbers to produce work and to collaborate using Google Education apps including Docs, Slides and Forms.

Average time spent each homework

1 hour

Typical tasks set

  • Consulting resources on Google Classroom
  • Producing presentations
  • Collaborative work
  • Research

Resources and Materials

Apps and websites habitually used

MrBvideclips: https://www.youtube.com/user/MrBvideoclips/playlists

Massolit lectures: https://www.massolit.io/

The Historical Association: https://www.history.org.uk

Moodle: www.runnymede-college.net

Seneca and Quizlet are recommended for revision.

Some classes will also use Moodle and Schoology to access resources

Introduction

Pupils who have chosen Latin as one their A level options will study the OCR A level Latin course.

Content

  • Catullus poems 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, 40, 70, 76, 85, 88, 89, 91, 107 (in Latin)
  • Ovid Heroides Ⅰ lines 1-68, Ⅶ lines 1-140 (in Latin)
  • Ovid Heroides Ⅰ, Ⅲ, Ⅶ (in English)
  • Cicero Pro Cluentio 1-7, 10-11, 27-32, 35-37 (in Latin), 9-18, 43-61, 181-185 (in English)

Skills

Pupils will be able to develop an appropriate level of competence in Classical Latin; to acquire the language skills which enable learners to read literary texts, both prose and verse, in the original language; to develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, the literary, historical and cultural features of the ancient world; to acquire the literary skills which enable learners to read ancient literature, both prose and verse, in its original language with appropriate attention to literary techniques, styles and genres; to apply analytical and evaluative skills at an appropriate level which show direct engagement with original texts in the ancient language; to make an informed personal response to the material studied; to begin to develop a sensitive and analytical approach to language generally.

Homework

Homework consists of vocabulary learning, grammar and syntax exercises, translation, narrative analysis and essay writing. Homework will be set once per week, on Google Classroom.

Assessment

There is one internal examination in Year 12, and a mock examination in Year 13, before the public examination. Translation skills, vocabulary and set text knowledge, and literary appreciation will be tested regularly.

Resources and Materials

Latin Beyond GCSE, Prose Unseens, Verse Unseens, Set Texts by OCR. Worksheets and booklets produced by the department.

Introduction

The new Maths A level (from 2017) now requires students to study elements from Pure Mathematics, Mechanics and Statistics. This enables pupils to have a much broader mathematical experience at A Level and helps provide a foundation for a wide range of higher education courses.
There are three overarching themes in the Edexcel Mathematics A Level Curriculum:

These themes build the on the skills developed in the IGCSE curriculum and are intended to develop a mathematician’s way of thinking.
A new element of the A level is the inclusion of a ‘large data set’ which supports the statistics element of the course.

The Mathematics department is unique in that it offers candidates two separate options in Mathematics, depending on the cohort option choices; the full A level qualification, or the AS qualification (half an A level).
Students who achieve a grade B or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study the full Mathematics A level. They will have nine forty minute lessons a week. They will have 3 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.
Students who achieve a grade C or higher at IGCSE are eligible to study towards the Mathematics AS level. They will have 5 forty minute lessons a week. They will have 2 compulsory Maths external examinations to complete at the end of Year 13.

Content

The linear style of the course means that material covered over the full two-year period will be examined at the end of Year 13.

AS Mathematics:2/3 Pure and 1/3 applied (2 final examinations)

  • Pure Mathematics Topics:
    Algebraic Expressions, Quadratics, Equations and Inequalities, Graphs and Transformations, Straight line graphs, Circles, Algebraic Methods, Binomial Expansion, Trigonometry, Vectors, Differentiation, Integration and Exponentials and Logarithms.
  • Applied Mathematics Topics:
    Statistics (Data Collection, Measures of Location and Speed, Representations of Data, Correlation, Probability, Statistical Distributions, Hypothesis Testing) and Mechanics (Modelling, Constant Acceleration, Forces and Motion, Variable Acceleration).

A Level Mathematics: 2/3 Pure and 1/3 applied (3 final examinations)

  • Pure Mathematics Topics
    Algebraic Expressions, Quadratics, Equations and Inequalities, Graphs and Transformations, Straight line graphs, Circles, Algebraic Methods, Binomial Expansion, Trigonometry, Vectors, Differentiation, Integration, Exponentials and Logarithms, Functions and Graphs, Sequences and Series, Radians, Parametric Equations and Numerical Methods.
  • Applied Mathematics Topics Statistics (Data Collection, Measures of Location and Speed, Representations of Data, Correlation, Probability, Statistical Distributions, Hypothesis Testing, Normal Distribution) and Mechanics (Modelling, Constant Acceleration, Forces and Friction, Motion, Variable Acceleration, Moments, Projectiles).

Skills

Students are examined on AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills at A Level. AO1 marks are rewarded for using and applying standard techniques and the skills required for this that we work on in Year 12 include learning definitions, following mathematical procedures and accurately recalling key facts. AO2 marks are rewarded for reasoning, interpreting and communicating effectively and the skills we focus on here are constructing mathematical arguments, making deductions and inferences, explaining reasoning and using mathematical language correctly. AO3 marks are rewarded for solving problems within mathematics and other contexts, and the skills we focus on here are interpreting solutions to problems, using mathematical models, and evaluating the outcomes of modelling in context.

Homework

Throughout the course, students are expected to carry out ongoing independent practice and complete unfinished class work in their own time. This is referred to as bookwork and uses the Edexcel textbooks that every student is issued with. At the end of each chapter, an independent Self Review task will be issued that students must complete within one week, then self mark once the mark scheme is released. An effort rating (out of 5 stars) will be issued by the teacher to assess the quality to which this has been completed.

Assessment

Self Review homework tasks are to prepare students to complete assessed Checkpoints in class. These could cover between 1 and 3 chapters. If students complete Self Reviews properly, they should be well prepared to test their skills in a Checkpoint and thereby solidify their knowledge.
Students will also be assessed formally throughout the course as follows:

Year 12

  1. September Baseline Test
  2. November Assessment
  3. January Assessment
  4. March Assessment
  5. June Assessment

All material is tested cumulatively to help students to build their knowledge and memory of the content in line with findings from recent educational research. Underachievement in assessments will be raised with students and parents in order to form a supportive action plan. These assessments are all considered when forming the predicted grade, with more emphasis on the latter assessments.

Year 13

  1. December Assessment
  2. March Mock Exams
  3. Final External Exams
    1. Mathematics: Pure 1, Pure 2, Applied
    2. AS Mathematics: Pure, Applied

Digital usage in this subject

Google Classroom – to access resources/topic handouts/worksheets in pdf format during lesson time or for revision purposes, and to hand in scanned self review homework tasks.

Average time spent each homework

Pupils are expected to spend approximately 1-2 hours per week completing self review homework tasks, plus 30 minutes daily textbook consolidation.

Typical tasks set

  • Google Classroom at home – students should upload and hand in scanned evidence of their hand written self review homework tasks.
  • Google Classroom  in lessons – when assessments are being reviewed, students complete an assessment feedback sheet via a Google sheets assignment on Google classroom. 

Resources and Materials

Students will be given a copy of the Pure and Applied textbooks they need (published by Pearson specifically for the Edexcel A Level Curriculum), which are to be returned at the end of the course.
The use of a graphical calculator is required and students will be given the opportunity to purchase this from the school in September. It is then their responsibility to look after it, bring it to every lesson, and ensure it has functioning batteries.

Revision materials, videos and links for all topics are available on the department website (www.runnymedemathematics.weebly.com) under VI Form, Regular Maths, Year 1 (AS) and Year 2.
In lessons, resources include use of the course textbook, Google Classroom, printed handouts and a wealth of activities and tasks created by the Mathematics team. Extra challenge tasks are always available and can be collected by the pupils to use for enrichment or revision purposes.

Apps and websites habitually used

IGCSE Music

At A level, students of Music continue to develop their ability to create original music, appraise unfamiliar music in a range of different genres and traditions, and, of course, to perform increasingly mature repertoire. The syllabus followed is the AQA A level Music (7272).
https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/music/as-and-a-level/music-7272

Digital usage in this subject

In Years 10, 11, 12 and 13, students should be using iPads or personal devices predominantly for the purpose of original composition. Subject-specific applications and websites used in Music include Flat: Music Score and Tab Editor, GarageBand, Focus on Sound, as well as Google Classroom. Whilst in the approach to coursework submission deadlines the time spent composing electronically will increase, students are given regular lesson time to develop this work. Students should not be spending more than 2 hours per week on average using their devices for the IGCSE or A level Music curriculum.

Introduction

Physics A Level from AQA provides a seamless transition to A Level from previous studies at IGCSE and develops students’ interest and enthusiasm for physics. The Year 12 course provides different starting points so teachers can choose to start the course with familiar or new topics. This allows the Physics department to develop a course that is not only challenging but academically stimulating for the students.

Four weekly classes of 80 minutes duration are dedicated to the study of physics over the two-year cycle. Normally, one of the four will be devoted to acquiring experimental skills through practical work in the laboratory. A full range of experiments centred mainly on mechanics, heat, light, oscillations, electricity and magnetism is undertaken.

Content

The full A Level course consists of a core content and an option module that allows students to pursue and area of physics that may be of more interest to them or relevant to an area of study at university.
Specification can be found at:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/specifications/AQA-7407-7408-SP-2015.PDF

  • Measurements and their errors
  • Particles and radiation
  • Waves
  • Mechanics and materials
  • Electricity
  • Further mechanics and thermal physics
  • Fields and their consequences
  • Nuclear physics
  • Astrophysics
  • Medical physics
  • Engineering physics
  • Turning points in physics
  • Electronics

Skills

The new A Level Physics course is designed to fully test students abilities to design, carry out, and communicate experimental procedures to a very high standard. The practical endorsement, now required when applying through UCAS to UK Universities, improves students investigative skills to a standard used by university departments around the world. The main skill foci are listed below.

1. To support and consolidate scientific concepts (knowledge and understanding). This is done by applying and developing what is known and understood of abstract ideas and models. Through practical work we are able to make sense of new information and observations, and provide insights into the development of scientific thinking.

2. To develop investigative skills. These transferable skills include:

Homework

Homework will comprise of exam style questions once per week, which focuses on the core content in the syllabus and at least one online homework set through ISAAC PHYSICS, which provides opportunities for extension. In addition to these common homework tasks pupils will have the opportunity to study for the Oxford challenges, however, this does require additional study at home.

Assessment

Students will be assessed at the end of every topic, and before each reporting cycle. Students will also receive and end of year full Internal exam which counts towards their predicted grades for university. In year 12 the students will be assessed on the following topics:

Digital usage in this subject

Graph plotting including tables, data analysis for practical work. In some cases note taking using the iPad or computer. Keynote/Powerpoint presentations. Online simulations for demos or even experiments, online homework

Average time spent each homework

Depends on topic might vary from no digital HW per week to maybe 1-2 hours. Core practicals require the use of spreadsheet and word processors and might take longer. Students are at times asked to produce presentations using Keynote/Powerpoint. YouTube videos might also be shared and set as homework on channels such as AlevelPhysics, Veritassium…  If students use their computer/iPad for notes and homework they might spend up to 3 hours per week.

Typical tasks set

Online assignment on a specific topic using the website Isaac Physics. Also, although they are normally given a printed copy, students have to do IOP (Institute of Physics questions) whose answers can be found online. Finally, resources, class presentations, links to videos or relevant material and homework is posted on Google Classroom.

Resources and Materials

Theory classes are supported by excellent textbooks – endorsed by AQA – that are seldom used in class but form the basis for home study and revision exercises:
“Advanced Physics For You” by Keith Johnson Published by Oxford university press
www.isaacphysics.com

The pupils are also provided with a further range of texts that go further and deeper than syllabus requirements.
Practical work is carried out in a purpose-built physics laboratory with a full range of apparatus including multimeters, signal generators and cathode ray oscilloscopes. The laboratory is equipped with an interactive white board that greatly facilitates the viewing of experimental simulations. The pupils are encouraged to do their own independent research and build a bank of internet addresses for future reference.

Apps and websites habitually used

Isaac Physics (online homework), physicsandmathstutor (past paper questions and revision), savemyexams (past paper questions and revision), umutech (past paper questions and revision), PHET simulations (online simulations), IOP (practice questions, not past papers), different YouTube channels (ALevelPhysics, ScienceShorts for example…) 

Introduction

The Spanish department at Runnymede College aims to encourage their students to:

The Year 12 Spanish course enables students to:

Content

Based on textbooks AQA Spanish AS and A Level, Oxford and Hodder Education

  • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
    Artistic culture in the Hispanic world
    Students must study the sub-theme Spanish regional identity in relation to Spain. Students may study the remaining sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
    Spanish regional identity (La identidad regional en España)
    • Tradiciones y costumbres
    • La gastronomía
    • Las lenguas
    Cultural heritage (El patrimonio cultural)
    • Sitios turísticos y civilizaciones prehispánicas: Machu Picchu, la Alhambra, etc
    • Arte y arquitectura
    • El patrimonio musical y su diversidad
  • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
  • C. Literature
    • Text: Las bicicletas son para el verano, by Fernando Fernán Gómez
    • Film: Tierra y Libertad, Ken Loach
  • D. Grammar and vocabulary:
    Main grammar book:
    Spanish verb tenses
    These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
    Grammar revision, main points:
    • Preterite/imperfect
    • Future
    • Conditional
    • Perfect tense
    • Future perfect
    • Conditional perfect
    • Pluperfect
    • Passive voice
    • Continuous tenses
    • Subjunctive mood
  • E. Essay writing and translations.
    Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week. Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
  • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
    Multiculturalism in Hispanic society (A Level topics)
    Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
    La inmigración
    • Los beneficios y los aspectos negativos
    • La inmigración en el mundo hispánico
    • Los indocumentados-problemas
  • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
  • C. Literature
    • Text: Revision of Las bicicletas son para el verano, by Fernando Fernán Gómez
    • Project: Analysis of the Spanish Civil War and the Spanish Second Republic
    • Film: Tierra y Libertad, Ken Loach
  • D. Grammar and vocabulary
    These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
  • E. Essay writing and translations
    Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week.
    Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.
    Grammar revision, main points:
    • Imperative
    • Present subjunctive
    • Perfect subjunctive
    • Imperfect subjunctive
    • Pluperfect subjunctive
    • Uses of the subjunctive
  • A. AQA syllabus content (2 weeks per sub-topic)
    Multiculturalism in Hispanic society (A Level topics)
    Students may study all sub-themes in relation to any Spanish-speaking country or countries.
    El racismo
    • Las actitudes racistas y xenófobas
    • Las medidas contra el racismo
    • La legislación anti-racista
  • B. Pupils answer the questions in the speaking test booklet as topics are covered.
  • C. Literature
    Film: Los santos inocentes, by Mario Camus
    Resources: https://zigzageducation.co.uk/support/languages/5805
  • D. Grammar and vocabulary:
    These two areas are an integral part of language teaching and take place indirectly at all times. We will also dedicate one period per week to verb conjugation, spelling, punctuation, and the acquisition of new vocabulary. Vocabulary tests will take place every two weeks.
  • E. Essay writing and translations.
    • Pupils write essays about the AQA A Level topics and about the literary works at least every other week.
    • Pupils practise their translation skills from Spanish into English and from English into Spanish.

Skills

Homework

Assessment

Being a language, assessment takes place in the classroom naturally on a daily basis. Moreover, formal written work is set and marked by the teacher at least once a week. Vocabulary and verbs are assessed at least every other week. Assessment is a very important part of this subject as it is essential that the teacher diagnoses the pupils’ weaknesses and focuses on them in order for pupils to overcome them.

Exam Description:
The A level exam consists of three papers:

  • Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing.academic
    Duration: 2 hours 30 minutes; total raw mark: 100
  • 2. Paper 2: Writing
    Duration: 2 hours; total raw mark: 80
  • 3. Paper 3: Speaking
    Duration: 21-23 minutes (including 5 minutes supervised preparation time); total raw mark: 60
    Note: these pupils will not sit the AS exam at the end of Year 12 but the A Level examination at the end of Year 13.

Digital usage in this subject

Written tasks on Pages, digital textbook (Kerboodle), dictionary, reading online books, watching films, TV programmes and documentaries, visiting websites of museums, World Heritage sites, official government pages and any other in relation to the topics in the syllabus. 

Average time spent each homework:

50-60 minutes 

Typical tasks set

Textbook activities on Kerboodle, practise verb conjugation in different websites, read newspapers and magazines, research about the topics studied, listening activities online, watch films and documentaries…

Resources and Materials

  • Telediario
  • Informe Semanal
  • La 2 noticias
  • Ciudades para el siglo XXI
  • Documentos TV
  • Repor
  • Para todos la 2
  • Un país para comérselo
  • Españoles por el mundo (all of the above can be found in www.rtve.es)

Apps and websites habitually used

Kerboodle, www.profedeele.comwww.runnymedespanish.weebly.comwww.aprenderespanol.comwww.wordreference.comrtve.es, Keynote, Pages, Numbers, Google Classroom, newspapers